Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Edward Everett or search for Edward Everett in all documents.

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freedom against slavery and feudal oppression. M. Fremont offered resolutions tendering the support of French citizens to the United States, but he hoped that the government, if the contest was carried to the extreme, would guarantee the total abolition of slavery.--N. Y. Daily News, April 29. President Lincoln decided that the ports of Virginia and North Carolina should be included in the blockade of the Southern harbors and issued a proclamation to that effect.--(Doc. 110.) Edward Everett delivered an eloquent Union speech, at a flag raising in Chester Square, Boston, Mass.--(Doc. 111.) The Harbor Police of New York seized six sloops in the harbor, laden with powder, which, it was supposed, was intended for the use of Secessionists. On the same day, Capt. Squires, of the Fifteenth Ward Police, seized several pairs of military pantaloons at the shop of a tailor in Ridge-street, who was recently in the employ of Newbeck & Co., No. 4 Dey-street, where 1,000 uniforms in
ing officers: Colonel, John F. Hartranft; Lieut. Col., Edward Schall; Major, Edwin Schall; Adjutant, Chas. Hunsicker; Quartermaster, Yerkes; Surgeon, Dunlop; Assistant-Surgeons, Christ and Rogers; Captains, Bolton, Schall, Chamberlain, Dunn, Snyder, Allabaugh, Amey, Brooke, Cooke, and Taylor. The regiment numbers about 900, and comprises a fine body of hardy yeomanry and artisans, who left their fields and shops to rally in defence of the National Capital.--National Intelligencer, May 9. The steam frigate Minnesota, the flag-ship of the blockading squadron, sailed from Boston, Mass.--Boston Transcript, May 8. A meeting in aid of the volunteers from Roxbury, Mass., was held in that city. Speeches were made by Rev. J. E. Bartholomew, Edward Everett, and Alexander H. Rice.--(Doc. 145.) General Butler, at the Relay House, Md., promulgated special brigade orders concerning the several events that have occurred at the camp at that place since its formation.--(Doc. 146.)
te is the road which diverges from the Frederick Road outside of Rockville, and passes through Poolesville direct to Edwards' Ferry and on to Leesburg, Va. For several weeks past the Edwards' Ferry route has been a general thoroughfare for secessionists from Maryland, and also for military stores, provisions, etc. The Fifth Battalion D. C. Volunteers took boats at the Chain Bridge yesterday morning at eight o'clock, and proceeded towards Edwards' Ferry. This battalion is commanded by Lieut.-Col. Everett.--Washington Star, June 12. The Third Michigan Regiment, numbering 1,040 men, left Grand Rapids this morning for the seat of war. They are a fine body of men fully armed, equipped, and ready for service.--N. Y. Commercial Advertiser, June 13. The Sixth Regiment N. Y. S. V., Colonel William Wilson's Zouaves, left New York for Fort Pickens. Previous to its departure the regiment was presented with a set of colors by the ladies of the Relief Committee.--(Doc. 249.) A port
the rebels, for the purpose of communicating intelligence to secessionists in or near-Washington.--Washington Star, June 15. A Little fight occurred near Seneca's Mill, on the Maryland side of the Potomac, 28 miles above Washington. Lieut.-Col. Everett, in command of three companies of District Volunteers, 200 men, (a detachment of Col. Stone's column,) started in canal boats from Georgetown, D. C., and were obliged to leave after a few miles up, the rebels having cut the dam. At Seneca the detachment was fired upon by 100 cavalry, on the Virginia side of the river. Col. Everett marched his men into the dry bed of the canal, and, sheltered by the opposite bank, returned the cavalry fire. Shots were exchanged for some time across the Potomac, a distance of seven-eighths of a mile. None of Col. E.'s men were injured. Two Virginia troopers were shot, one thought to be killed, as well as the commander, supposed to be Capt. Shreves. Upon the fall of their leader, the cavalry re
on introduced a resolution providing for the release of slaves confined in prison in Washington. The subject was referred to the Committee on District of Columbia Affairs. On motion of Mr. Wilson, the same committee were directed to consider the question of abolishing slavery in the District of Columbia, allowing compensation to loyal owners of slaves.--Mr. Saulsbury, of Delaware, proposed the appointment of a commission, consisting of Millard Fillmore, Franklin Pierce, Roger B. Taney, Edward Everett, George M. Dallas, Thomas M. Ewing, Horace Binney, Reverdy Johnson, John J. Crittenden, and George C. Pugh, to confer with a like number of commissioners from the so-called Confederate States, with a view to the restoration of peace, the preservation of the Union, and the maintenance of the constitution, and that during the pendency of the deliberations of the joint commissioners, active hostilities should cease. The proposition was laid on the table.--(Doc. 211.) Queen Victoria is
main force of the rebels will be forced to surrender. A party of rebel cavalry, under the command of Captain White, entered Waterford, Va., early this morning, and captured a large portion of a company of National cavalry under Capt. Means. Capt. Means escaped.--The Nineteenth regiment of Maine volunteers, under the command of Col. Frederick D. Sewall, left Bath for the seat of war.--An enthusiastic war meeting was held at Boston, Mass., at which speeches were made by Gov. Andrew, Edward Everett, Robert C. Winthrop, Senator McDougal of California, and others.--Battle Creek, Ala., was evacuated by the Union army under General Buell. The battle of Kettle Run, near Bristow Station, Va., was this day fought by the Union forces under Gen. Hooker, and a division of the rebel army of Gen. Jackson, under Gen. Ewell. The engagement lasted for several hours, terminating only at dark, the rebels retreating with great loss.--(Doc. 104.) A great war meeting was held in the city of
forcements, ventured a movement on the Union right, with the evident intention of assailing them by flank and rear. This design also failed, and the National forces repulsed the assailants a second time. They did not again make a stand, but made a hurried retreat, even heaving behind their dead, of whom there were several. The Unionists took no prisoners, but the enemy's loss in killed and wounded was considerable.--Chicago Times. A Union Club was organized in Boston, Mass., and Edward Everett was elected to its presidency.--A slight cavalry fight took place near Petersburgh, Tenn., between a party of rebels and bushwhackers, and two hundred loyal Tennesseeans, under the command of Licutenant-Colonel Brownlow, in which the rebels were routed, with twelve killed and twenty wounded.--Captain Schultze, with a company of Union cavalry, surprised Mosby's rebel guerrillas at a point near Aldie, Va., and succeeded in capturing thirty of them, without any loss on the National side.