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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 80 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 9, 1865., [Electronic resource] 20 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for Tecumseh Sherman or search for Tecumseh Sherman in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces in the operations at New Orleans, La. (search)
    1       1 Stonewall Jackson, Capt. Geo. W. Philips           1     1 Defiance, Capt. Joseph D. McCoy         1       1 Resolute, Capt. Isaac Hooper       1 1       2 General Lovell, Capt. Burdett Paris         1       1 R. J. Breckinridge, Capt. James Smith.           1     1 Total 2 4 4 10 15 2 1 2 40 Unarmed tugs. Landis, Captain Davis, and W. Burton, Captain Hammond (tenders to the Louisiana); Phoenix, Captain James Brown (tender to the Manassas); Mosher, Captain Sherman, and Belle Algerine, Captain Jackson (k); Music, Captain McClellan (tender to the forts); Star, Captain Laplace (telegraph boat). The last four were chartered by the army. Grand total of Confederate guns, 166. Confederate Army. Major-General Mansfield Lovell. Coast defenses, Brig.-Gen. Johnson K. Duncan. forts Jackson and St. Philip, Lieut.-Col. Edward Higgins. Fort Jackson: La. Scouts and Sharp-shooters, Capt. W. G. Mullen; St. Mary's (La.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Jackson's raid around Pope. (search)
ustavus W. Smith, R. H. Anderson, A. P. Stewart, and Earl Van Dorn were among the Confederate commanders who were graduated in the same class with me. Of the Federal commanders, there were of that class — besides Pope--Generals John Newton, W. S. Rosecrans, George Sykes, Abner Doubleday, and others less prominent. Stonewall Jackson came on four years after my class. General Lee had preceded us about fourteen years. General Ewell, who was hurt in this battle, was in the same class with Tecumseh Sherman and George H. Thomas. A truer soldier and nobler spirit than Ewell never drew sword. Jeb Stuart was a very daring fellow and the best cavalryman America ever produced. At the Second Manassas, soon after we heard of the advance of McDowell and Porter, Stuart came up and made a report to General Lee. When he had done so General Lee said he had no orders at that moment, but he requested Stuart to wait awhile. Thereupon Stuart turned round in his tracks, lay down on the ground, put a
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Iuka and Corinth. (search)
erals-in-chief of the armies of the United States,--Halleck himself, and after him the three most successful of all the soldiers that fought for the Union--Grant, Sherman, and Sheridan; and with them were George H. Thomas, whom Greeley believed to be the greatest soldier of them all, and Buell, and Pope, and Rosecrans, and many othorinth, Hurlbut was told to make a great fuss, and to let it leak out that he was expecting heavy reinforcements from Columbus, and that as soon as they came, he, Sherman and Steele were going to make a dash for Grenada and the Yazoo country. On the 19th of September, 1862, General Grant telegraphed to General Halleck that before the enemy were experiencing all the weakening effects of a retreating army, whose means of supplies and munitions are always difficult to keep in order. We had Sherman at Memphis with two divisions, and we had Hurlbut at Bolivar with one division and John A. Logan at Jackson, Tennessee, with six regiments. With these there was
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of Corinth. (search)
country along the Mississippi Central to Grenada, and especially below that place, was a corn country — a rich farming country — and the corn was ripe. If Grant had not stopped us, we could have gone to Vicksburg. My judgment was to go on, and with the help suggested we could have done so. Under the pressure of a victorious force the enemy were experiencing all the weakening effects of a retreating army, whose means of supplies and munitions are always difficult to keep in order. We had Sherman at Memphis with two divisions, and we had Hurlbut at Bolivar with one division and John A. Logan at Jackson, Tennessee, with six regiments. With these there was nothing to save Mississippi from our grasp. We were about six days march from Vicksburg, and Grant could have put his force through to it with my column as the center one of pursuit. Confederate officers told me afterward that they never were so scared in their lives as they were after the defeat before Corinth. I have thus gi