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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Cumberland Gap. (search)
ten Chattanooga, and thus draw the main force of the Confederates in that direction. About four miles south of Cumberland Gap is a narrow defile formed by an abrupt mountain on one side, and the Cumberland River on the other, through which passes the State Road to Cumberland Gap, and on the edge of the defile was an abandoned cabin, known as The Moss House, situated at the junction of the State Road and a pathway leading to Lambdin's on the main road to Big Creek Gap. On the morning of May 22d I sent forward the brigade of De Courcy, with a battery, with orders to occupy Brigadier-General George W. Morgan. From a photograph. the defile, and, as a stratagem intended to puzzle Smith, to construct a fort at the junction of the pathway and road. I threw forward a strong party of pioneers to widen the path leading to Lambdin's, so as to enable my artillery and train to move forward. The mountain was steep and rugged, and skill and toil were necessary to the accomplishment of t
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Hooker's appointment and removal. (search)
Corps. General Couch had felt outraged in every nerve and fiber of his being by the conduct of General Hooker from the 1st to the 5th of May. . . . Not that General Couch was alone in this feeling, which was shared by nearly all the commanders of the army; hutat once his nature as a man and his position as the senior corps commander made him peculiarly the spokesman in the representations and remonstrances addressed to General Hooker, . . . and when consulted by President Lincoln on the 22d of May he advised that General Meade should be placed in command, stating that he himself would have great pleasure in serving under that officer, though senior to him. To the suggestion of his own succession to the command General Couch returned a firm and sincere negative. . . . In this spirit [having lost confidence in Hooker], with pain inexpressible, General Couch asked to be relieved from further service with the Army of the Potomac.--editors. General Lee's invasion of Pennsylvania b
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The defense of Vicksburg. (search)
at an average distance of about eight hundred yards from our works. The Confederates utilized the time in putting up traverses against enfilade fires, and in making covered approaches from the camps in rear to the line of works. Many a man and officer had already been picked off by the quick-sighted Federal sharp-shooters, while passing along our lines or between them and the cooking-camps. It took several days for our men to learn the caution necessary to protect themselves. On the 22d of May the gun-boats moved up within range and opened fire upon the river front. At the same time several dense columns of troops assaulted our lines in the rear. These assaults covered the right of General Smith's position, where General Shoup's brigade was posted, the whole of General Forney's front, and that of Stephen D. Lee's brigade of Stevenson's division. The assaults were made with great determination and admirable courage by the Federal soldiers. Once, twice, three times they came f
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The Vicksburg mine. (search)
The Vicksburg mine. by Andrew Hickenlooper, Brevet Brigadier-General, U. S. V., chief engineer of the Seventeenth Army Corps. After the failure of the general assault on May 11 22d, orders were issued to commence regular siege operations. General J. B. McPherson occupied the center with the Seventeenth Army Corps, covering the main Jackson road, on which the Confederates had constructed the most formidable redoubt on the entire line, and intrusted its defense to the 3d Louisiana, a veteran regiment. Because of its strength, commanding position, and heavy armament, this redoubt became the main objective point of the engineering operations of the Seventeenth Army Corps. It was approachable only over a broad, fiat ridge, forming a comparatively level plateau, extending eastwardly from the fort for a distance of almost five hundred yards before descending into one of the numerous ravines or depressions which extended in almost every conceivable direction over the ground lying betw
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces in the Vicksburg campaign: May 1st-July 4th, 1863. (search)
rg, assault May 19th, k, 2; w, 15=17; assault May 22d, k, 14; w, 82; m, 2 = 98. Second Brigade, Cols: Champion's Hill, w, 3. Vicksburg, assault May 22d, w, 3. Twelfth division, Brig.-Gen. Alvin g, assault May 19th, k, 1; w, 9 = 10; assault May 22d, k, 2; w, 5 = 7. Second Brigade, Col. Charleslt May 19th, k, 37; w, 164; m, 1=202; assault May 22d, k, 20; w, 81; m, 1=102. Second Brigade, Col. May 19th, k, 29; w, 125; m, 1 = 155; assault May 22d, k, 11; w, 45=56. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Hs: Vicksburg, assault May 19th, w, 2; assault May 22d, k, 2. Cavalry: A and B, Thielemann's (Ill.) rg, assault May 19th, k, 1; w, 1 = 2; assault May 22d, w, 5. Artillery, Capt. Nelson T. Spoor: E, 1 22; w, 104; mn, 9 = 135. Vicksburg, assault May 22d, k, 7; w, 72; mn, 2 =81. Second Brigade, Brigl, k, 7; w, 36; m, 18=61. Vicksburg, assault May 22d, k, 34; w, 238=272. Artillery, Maj. Charles Jssault May 19th, k, 14; w, 110 = 124; assault May 22d, k, 57; w, 275; m, 32= 364. Third Brigade, Co[19 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Naval operations in the Vicksburg campaign. (search)
ls then in course of construction. A second expedition under Walker, a few days later, struck out into the tributary streams, the Sunflower, Rolling Fork, and the smaller bayous, burning the transports that had taken refuge there. Several steamers were sunk by the enemy on Walker's approach, and three were captured and burnt by his vessels. Navigation in the Yazoo Valley was broken up, and the destruction of military supplies and provisions was enormous. During Grant's assault on the 22d of May, the fleet below Vicksburg kept up a heavy fire on the hill and water batteries, and during the siege the mortar-boats were incessantly at work, shelling the city and the batteries. From time to time the gun-boats joined in the bombardment, notably on May 27th and June 20th. On the first of these occasions, the Cincinnati, Lieutenant George M. Bache, engaged alone the battery on Fort Hill, the principal work above Vicksburg, while the other iron-clads, under Commander Woodworth, were sim