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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The removal of McClellan. (search)
mstances had somewhat changed. Among other things, Stuart crossed the Potomac at Williamsport on the 10th of October, on his famous raid into Maryland and Pennsylvania, rode completely around the rear of the Army of the Potomac, and, eluding Pleasonton's vigorous but ineffectual pursuit, safely recrossed the river near the mouth of the Monocacy. One effect of this raid on the mind of the President is indicated in an anecdote related in Washington under Banks, Vol. II. of this work, p. 544.-treet's corps, had kept pace with McClellan's movement and advanced to Culpeper, and Jackson was still in the Valley of Virginia, distant several days' march behind Thornton's Gap, with D. H. Hill holding the western entrance to the gap against Pleasonton, who was on the east, observing its debouch. On that very day, the 5th of November, 1862, President Lincoln, with his own hand, wrote the following order: It is virtually certain that General McClellan never saw this order, which, in the
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces at Fredericksburg, Va. (search)
k, 14; w, 187; m, 54 == 255. Second Brigade, Col. Edward Harland: 8th Conn., Maj. John E. Ward, Capt. Henry M. Hoyt; 11th Conn., Col. Griffin A. Stedman, Jr.; 15th Conn., Lieut.-Col. Samuel Tolles; 16th Conn., Capt. Charles L. Upham; 21st Conn., Col. Arthur H. Dutton; 4th R. I., Lieut.-Col. Joseph B. Curtis (k), Maj. Martin P. Buffum. Brigade loss: k, 2; w, 29; m, 10 == 41. Artillery: E, 2d U. S., Lieut. Samuel N. Benjamin; A, 5th U. S., Lieut. James Gilliss. cavalry division, Brig.-Gen. Alfred Pleasonton. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John F. Farnsworth: 8th Ill., Col. William Gamble; 3d Ind., Maj. George H. Chapman; 8th N. Y., Col. Benjamin F. Davis. Second Brigade, Col. David McM. Gregg, Col. Thomas C. Devin: 6th N. Y., Col. Thomas C. Devin, Lieut.-Col. Duncan McVicar; 8th Pa., Lieut.-Col. Amos E. Griffiths; 6th U. S., Capt. George C. Cram. Artillery: M, 2d U. S., Lieut. Alexander C. M. Pennington, Jr. center Grand division, Maj.-Gen. Jos. Hooker. Third Army Corps, Brig.-Gen. G
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., A bit of partisan service. (search)
hundred times its own number. The line must be stronger at every point than the attacking force, else it is broken. At that time Hooker asked that the cavalry division belonging to the defenses of Washington be sent to the front to reinforce Pleasonton when he crossed the Rappahannock to engage Stuart in the great cavalry combat of June 9th. At Brandy Station.--editors. It was refused on the ground that it was necessary to keep it where it was, in order to protect the communication between the army and Washington. Afew days before that fight we struck the railroad within two miles of this cavalry camp, and captured and burned a train of supplies going up to Pleasonton. The 3000 men who came after me could not run any faster than the twenty with me. We vanished like the children of the mist, and the major-general who pursued reported that we had been annihilated. But within less than a week I pul led myself together again, crossed the Potomac about twelve miles above Washington
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 3.25 (search)
running for their lives. Gathering up such troops as were nearest to the scene of action, Berry's division from the Third Corps, some from the Twelfth, Hays's brigade of the Second, and a portion of the Eleventh, an effectual stand was made. Pleasonton, who was returning from the front, where he had been operating with Sickles (at the time Jackson attacked), taking in the state of things, rapidly moved his two regiments of cavalry and a battery to the head and right flank of the enemy's advanf the Eleventh Corps on the Plank road. his right flank perpendicular to the old one and barely half a mile to the right of Chancellorsville. Sickles was retired, with the two columns, from his advanced position in the afternoon to near where Pleasonton had had his encounter, before mentioned, some distance to the left of the new line of our right flank and close up to the enemy. The situation was thought to be a very critical one by General Hooker, who had simply a strong body in front of th
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The successes and failures of Chancellorsville. (search)
ses and failures of Chancellorsville. by Alfred Pleasonton, Brevet Major-General, U. S. A. UniMajor Clifford Thomson, a-ide-de-camp on General Pleasonton's staff, in a letter written in 1866 givaccount of the fight at Hazel Grove: General Pleasonton rode from gun to gun, directing the gunnhey could not be clearly distinguished. General Pleasonton was about to give the order to fire, wheseen — trophies picked up on the field. General Pleasonton turned to me and said: Mr. Thomson,the report of the first shot fired at me General Pleasonton had opened fire, and those twenty-two gune. Word had gone out through the army that Pleasonton and his staff had been killed; so, when tire the army a day or two after this fight, General Pleasonton chanced to call at Hooker's headquartersofficer said: Mr. President, this is General Pleasonton, who saved the Army of the Potomac the onct of a natural soldier, could have enabled Pleasonton to accomplish so much in so short a time wit[2 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 3.27 (search)
that he had been sent for a regiment of General Pleasonton's cavalry. General Sickles immediately General Pleasonton to send a regiment. General Pleasonton then ordered me to report with my regimeFrom the information I had received from General Pleasonton, and from hearing the aide make his repor in the charge, was unable to recognize General Pleasonton's description of it and the surrounding h no idea that it would be preserved. General Pleasonton's report of the operations of his commanand no mention is made of any order from General Pleasonton to charge. This report was before Pleas. in reply to statements contained in General Pleasonton's paper, p. 179.--editors. by James F. H . . The enemy showing himself on the plain, Pleasonton met the attack at short range with the well-as broken up and routed on the 2d, . . . General Pleasonton collected some batteries belonging to dis of the remarkable tumulus described by General Pleasonton, it certainly did not contain the debris[8 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The Eleventh Corps at Chancellorsville. (search)
arm into good position to cover Devens's flank. Devens held at least two regiments well in hand, for the same purpose, and Steinwehr's whole division I knew could just face about and defend the same point. A few companies of cavalry came from Pleasonton. I sent them out. Go out beyond my right; go far, and let me know if an assault is coming. All my staff, Asmussen, Meysenberg, Whittlesey, C. H. Howard, Schofield, Dessauer, Stinson, Schirmer, and Hoffmann, were keenly on the alert. We had nused to the first division of our enemy, all his rear lines had closed up, and the broad mass began to appear even below me on my left front to the south of Steinwehr's knoll. Then it was, after we had been fighting an hour, that Sickles's and Pleasonton's guns began to be heard, for they had faced about at Hazel Grove obliquely toward the north-west, and were hurrying artillery, cavalry, and infantry into position to do what they could against the attack now reaching them. I had come to my
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces in the Chancellorsville campaign. (search)
ol. Koert S. Van Voorhis. Brigade loss: k, 49; w, 219; in, 260 = 528. Artillery, Capt. Joseph M. Knap: E, Pa., Lieut. Charles Atwell (w), Lieut. James D. McGill; F, Pa., Capt. Robert B. Hampton (k), Lieut. James P. Fleming. Artillery loss: k, 3; w, 15 = 18. cavalry Corps, The Second and Third Divisions, First Brigade, First Division, and the Regular Reserve Brigade, with Robertson's and Tidball's batteries, on the Stoneman raid. Brig.-Gen. George Stoneman. First division, Brig.-Gen. Alfred Pleasonton. First Brigade, Col. Benjamin F. Davis; 8th Ill., Lieut.-Col. David R. Clendenin; 3d Ind., Col. George H. Chapman; 8th N. Y.,----; 9th N. Y., Col. William Sackett. Brigade loss: k, 1; w, 8; m, 22 = 31. Second Brigade, Col. Thomas C. Devin: L, 1st Mich., Lieut. John K. Truax; 6th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Duncan MoVicar (k), Capt. William E. Beardsley; 8th Pa., Maj. Pennock Huey; 17th Pa., Col. Josiah H. Kellogg; 6th N. Y. Battery, Lieut. Joseph W. Martin. Brigade loss: k, 12; w, 54; m,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The Confederate cavalry in the Gettysburg campaign. (search)
nsinuates, a courier from General Lee met me. My command was hurried from there to Chambersburg, and thence by forced march, on the night of July 2d, to Cashtown, where it arrived at about 10 A. M. on July 3d. Ascertaining at Cashtown that General Pleasonton was moving from Emmitsburg directly on the baggage and ammunition trains of General Lee's army, which were exposed to his attack without defense of any kind, I pressed forward with my command and intercepted the advance of General PleasontoGeneral Pleasonton, under the command of Major Samuel H. Starr. A severe and gallant fight was made at Fairfield, in which Major Starr of the 6th United States Regular Cavalry was wounded and captured with a large portion of his staff, while his regiment was severely damaged. Adjutant John Allan and three others of the 6th Virginia Cavalry were killed, 19 were wounded, and 5 were reported missing. That fight at Fairfield, on the last day of the fighting at Gettysburg, refutes the imputation intended by Colo
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The first day at Gettysburg. (search)
not until 1863 that it was united under General Pleasonton in a corps consisting of three weak divi infantry were still near that town, ordered Pleasonton to beat up Stuart's camps at Culpeper, and gposed movements. For these purposes he gave Pleasonton two small brigades of infantry, 3000 men undFleetwood Hill. Dividing his force equally, Pleasonton ordered Buford and Ames to cross at Beverly forces in the most favorable manner to meet Pleasonton's converging movements. At daybreak BuforDuffie finally came up and Gregg reported to Pleasonton, informing him of the approach of Confederate infantry from Culpeper. Pleasonton, who had captured some important dispatches and orders, now coat 485, of whom 301 were killed or wounded. Pleasonton reports an aggregate loss (exclusive of Duffd neither. As soon as Hooker learned from Pleasonton that a large infantry force was at Culpeper,7th he encountered, near Aldie, a portion of Pleasonton's command; a fierce fight ensued, which left[1 more...]
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