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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 178 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 85 1 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 83 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 62 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 55 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3.. You can also browse the collection for W. M. Polk or search for W. M. Polk in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 8.89 (search)
it was through the whole Southern army. Captain W. M. Polk, from data furnished him by General Marc He divided his army into two wings; he gave to Polk the right wing, consisting of the corps of Hillto him to conduct him to Cleburne's right. General Polk, however, as wing commander, gave General Bnd my chief-of-staff gave me a message from General Polk that my corps had been put under his comman and the whole of my staff to that effect. General Polk had issued an order for an attack at daylig the first time nineteen years afterward in Captain Polk's letter to the Southern Historical Societywho was to be posted there to conduct me to General Polk, I sent Lieutenant Morrison, aide-de-camp, r hours. At 7:25 an order was shown me from General Polk, directed to my major-generals, to begin the, and that my men were getting their rations. Polk soon after came up, and assented to the delay. ants or the assailed. He said angrily, I found Polk after sunrise sitting down reading a newspaper
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., General Polk at Chickamauga. (search)
Polk, of his staff. The reason given by General Polk for the delay in attack on the morning of Sill's corps was not ready for the assault. General Polk sent General Hill an order at midnight to are reported to be). Upon learning this fact General Polk issued an order, dated 5:30 A. M., direct tare derived from the official statements of General Polk, Captain Wheless, and of John H. Fisher, onRecords office. As to the whereabouts of General Polk, on the morning of the 20th: General Polk lry 8th, 1873: The staff-officer sent to General Polk (Major Lee, A. I. G.) to urge his complianceneral Bragg's message to General Polk, at his (Polk's) camp in the woods, at Alexander's Bridge, 12 I will also add of my own knowledge that General Polk had ridden from one end of his line to the he failure to attack on the 13th, the object of Polk's movement was to intercept Crittenden before h impression that Crittenden's escape was due to Polk's tardiness in moving rather than to his own ta[7 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Reenforcing Thomas at Chickamauga. (search)
with the intermingled dead of friend and foe. The morning of Sunday, the 20th, opened with a cloudless sky, but a fog had come up from the warm water of the Chickamauga and hung over the battle-field until 9 o'clock. A silence of desertion was in the front. This quiet continued till nearly 10 o'clock; then, as the peaceful tones of the church-bells, rolling over the land from the east, reached the meridian of Chiekamauga, they were made dissonant by the murderous roar of the artillery of Bishop Polk, who was opening the battle on Thomas's front. Granger, who had been ordered at all hazards to hold fast where he was, listened and grew impatient. Shortly before 10 o'clock, calling my attention to a great column of dust moving from our front toward the point from which came the sound of battle, he said, They are concentrating over there. That is where we ought to be. The corps flag marked his headquarters in an open field near the Ringgold road. He walked up and down in front of hi
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Notes on the Chickamauga campaign. (search)
to advance upon our divisions in succession, and involve the whole in one common ruin. Their right wing was commanded by Polk, and their left by Longstreet. Polk was ordered to begin the battle at day-break, but the first shots were not heard bePolk was ordered to begin the battle at day-break, but the first shots were not heard before 8:30; and, in an hour, the action at the left became furious. Polk's right division began to envelop our left and to appear upon our rear; but Thomas hurried some reserves against it and drove it away in disorder. Having been able, in the absePolk's right division began to envelop our left and to appear upon our rear; but Thomas hurried some reserves against it and drove it away in disorder. Having been able, in the absence of Negley's division, to find the way to our left and rear, the enemy would naturally reappear there with decisive numbers. Thomas, therefore, knowing nothing of Negley's conduct, and wishing to add only a division to his left, sent again and ag, again turn, and then overwhelm Reynolds, and attack the rear of Palmer, Johnson, and Baird, who were still confronted by Polk. Wood coolly changed front under fire, so as to face south instead of east, and caused one of his brigades to charge with