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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 4.14 (search)
avalry so far in the war and the belief that it was capable of accomplishing much more than it had done if under a thorough leader. I said I wanted the very best man in the army for that command. Halleck was present and spoke up, saying: How would Sheridan do? I replied The very man I want. The President said I could have anybody I wanted. Sheridan was telegraphed for that day, and on his arrival was assigned to the command of the with the Army of the Potomac. This relieved General Alfred Pleasonton. It w as not a reflection on that officer, however, for as far as I knew he had been as efficient as any other cavalry commander. Banks in the Department of the Gulf was ordered to assemble all his troops at New Orleans in time to join in the general move, Mobile to be his objective. At this time I was not entirely decided as to whether I should move the Army of the Potomac by the right flank of the enemy or by his left. Each plan presented advantages. If by his right — my
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Resume of military operations in Missouri and Arkansas, 1864-65. (search)
pursuit from St. Louis and Jefferson City, under Generals Alfred Pleasonton General Pleasonton, who was relieved from theGeneral Pleasonton, who was relieved from the command of the Cavalry Corps of the Army of the Potomac in March, 1864, served in the Department of Missouri from March 23drly every foot of the ground from Lexington to Big Blue, Pleasonton's provisional cavalry division of Rosecrans's army was mf the Big Blue back upon the State line and Kansas City, Pleasonton's cavalry came up and attacked the rear of Price's army, the west side of the Big Blue, just south of Westport. Pleasonton's cavalry encamped that night around and in the neighborst of Westport. At daylight on the 23d the columns of Pleasonton began to move west, and those of Curtis to move south, aAfter the battle near Westport the cavalry of Curtis and Pleasonton kept up the pursuit and was constantly engaged in skirmior the guns which he still had. The troops of Curtis and Pleasonton, who reached Fort Scott that night and replenished their