hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 226 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 150 6 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 112 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 90 2 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 77 9 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 70 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 59 1 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 36 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 31 1 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 19 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. You can also browse the collection for Alexander P. Stewart or search for Alexander P. Stewart in all documents.

Your search returned 78 results in 12 document sections:

1 2
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Opposing Sherman's advance to Atlanta. (search)
, if beaten, had none nearer than Atlanta, 100 miles off, with three rivers intervening. General Sherman's course indicating no intention of giving battle east of Rocky-face, we prepared to fight on either side of the ridge. For that object A. P. Stewart's division was placed in the gap, Cheatham's on the crest of the hill, extending a mile north of Stewart's, and Bate's also on the crest of the hill, and extending a mile south of the gap. Stevenson's was formed across the valley east of the r he made no attack, although he was before it about six weeks. I was a party to no such conversations as those given by Mr. Hill. No soldier above idiocy could express the opinions he ascribes to me. Mr. Davis condemned me for not fighting. General Sherman's testimony and that of the Military Cemetery at Marietta refute the charge. I assert that had one of the other lieutenant-generals of the army (Hardee or Stewart) succeeded me, Atlanta would have been held by the Army of Tennessee.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the Atlanta campaign. May 3d-September 8th, 1864. (search)
t; 31st Ala., Col. ]). R. Hundley, Capt. J. J. Nix, Maj. G. W. Mathieson; 46th Ala., Maj. George E. Brewer, Capt. J. W. Powell. Stewart's division, Maj.-Gen. Alexander P. Stewart, Maj.-Gen. H. D. Clayton. Escort: C, 1st Ga. Cav., Capt. George T. Watts. Stovall's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. M. A. Stovall, Col. Abda Johnson, Brig.- Engineer troops, Lieut.-Col. S. W. Presstman. Polk's (or Stewart's) Corps, Army of Mississippi, Lieut.-Gen. Leonidas Polk, Maj.-Gen. W. W. Loring, Lieut.-Gen. A. P. Stewart, Maj.-Gen. B. F. Cheatham, Lieut.-Gen. A. P. Stewart. Escort: Orleans Light Horse, Capt. L. Greenleaf. Loring's division, Maj.-Gen. W. W. Loring, BLieut.-Gen. A. P. Stewart. Escort: Orleans Light Horse, Capt. L. Greenleaf. Loring's division, Maj.-Gen. W. W. Loring, Brig.-Gen. W. S. Featherston, Maj.-Gen. W. W. Loring. Escort: B, 7th Tenn. Cav., Capt. J. P. Russell. Featherston's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. W. S. Featherston, Col. Robert Lowry, Brig.-Gen. W. S. Featherston: 1st Miss., Maj. M. S. Alcorn; 3d Miss., Col. T. A. Melton, Lieut.-Col. S. M. Dyer; 22d Miss., Maj. Martin A. Oatis, Lieut.-C
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The struggle for Atlanta. (search)
crossing the river on a floating bridge, hastily constructed, followed directly with the Fourth and the Fourteenth corps. Stanley had some sharp fighting with Stewart's Confederate division, which was acting as Johnston's rear-guard. It was, in fact, a running skirmish, that lasted till evening, at the close of which we encamprce in that quarter, pushed up the road toward New Hope Church. He had gone but a short distance before he ran upon one of Hood's brigades. It was an outpost of Stewart's division, put there to create delay. Hooker soon dislodged this outpost and moved on, driving back the brigade through the woods, till he came upon the enemy'sston had planned to attack Sherman at Peach Tree Creek, expecting just such a division between our wings as we made. Hood endeavored to carry out the plan. A. P. Stewart now had Polk's corps, and Cheatham took Hood's. Hardee on the right and Stewart on his left, in lines that overlapped Newton's position, at 3 o'clock of the 20
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Georgia militia about Atlanta. (search)
, which it could hold forever, and so win the campaign of which that place was the object. The passage of Peach Tree Creek may not have given an opportunity to attack; but there is no reason to think that the second and far most promising plan might not have been executed. In addition to the above claim, that he could have held Atlanta forever if he had not been relieved of command, General Johnston now says: I assert that had one of the other lieutenant-generals of the army (Hardee or Stewart) succeeded me Atlanta would have been held. It is not proposed to discuss this assertion, nor to refer to the claim made by General Johnston in his own behalf, farther than may be necessary to elucidate briefly its connection with the Georgia militia. At the time General Johnston was relieved the militia numbered about two thousand effectives, and the troops promised by Governor Brown were just beginning to assemble. Atlanta was not strongly fortified, and the Federal army on the east
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 5.43 (search)
ions of, and establishing communication with, Stewart's and Hardee's corps. After having establiassembled the three corps commanders, Hardee, Stewart, and Cheatham, together with Major-General G.eneral Thomas. Unfortunately, the corps on Stewart's right, although composed of the best troopsrging down upon the foe as Sherman represents Stewart's men to have done, many of the troops, when of Colonel Presstman and his assistants. Generals Stewart, Cheatham, and G. W. Smith were instructedquarters the three corps commanders, Hardee, Stewart, and Cheatham, together with Major-General Wht from his neighbor in the hour of battle. Stewart, Cheatham, and G. W. Smith were ordered to octh would, thereupon, join in the attack. General Stewart, posted on the left, was instructed not o At dawn on the morning of the 22d, Cheatham, Stewart, and G. W. Smith had, by alternating working grew to such dimensions that I sent Lieutenant-General Stewart to his support. The contest lasted [15 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The navy in the Red River. (search)
ing unarmed were destroyed. Captain Phelps concluded to wait till the next day to run the batteries, which was successfully accomplished under a heavy fire, the Juliet sustaining a loss of 15 killed and wounded, and the Fort Hindman 7. The destruction of the Eastport and the action of the Cricket occurred on the 26th. While the Cricket was running the gauntlet of the Confederate position, the pump-boat Champion No. 3 received a shot in her boiler, causing it to explode. The captain, Stewart, three engineers, and all the crew, composed of some 200 negroes, were scalded to death, with the exception of 15. The Champion No. 5 retreated with the Hindman and Juliet, above the Confederate battery, and on the 27th attempted to make the passage down in their company. Unable to get by, she was guided to the opposite bank by her pilot, Maitland, who remained at the wheel after having received eight wounds. The boat finally sank, and most of the crew were captured.--editors. April
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 9.64 (search)
corps commanders, Lieutenant-Generals Lee and Stewart and Major-General Cheatham. If after calm deon to them, I added, Go and do this at once. Stewart is near at hand, and I will have him double-qr the pike, and again sent a staff-officer to Stewart and Johnson to push forward. At the same tim of orders from him; nor did he remember that Stewart's corps was not ordered forward until about dthe pike, and to inform him of the arrival of Stewart, whose corps I intended to throw on his left, I then asked General Cheatham whether or not Stewart's corps, if formed on the right, would extendes in that vicinity, soon closed upon us, and Stewart's corps, after much annoyance, went into bivoand thus could have made it an easy matter to Stewart's corps, Johnson's division, and Lee's two di; Lee's corps marched in advance, followed by Stewart's and Cheatham's corps, and the troops bivouad in the center and across the Franklin pike; Stewart occupied the left and Cheatham the right — th[18 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 9.65 (search)
sight; informing them at the same time that General Hood had just told me that Stewart's column was close at hand, and that General Stewart had been ordered to go toGeneral Stewart had been ordered to go to my right and place his command across the pike. I further — more said to them that I would go myself and see that General Bate was placed in position to connect wight was outflanked several hundred yards. I had urged General Hood to hurry up Stewart and place him on my right, and had received from him the assurance that this w and make the attack, knowing that Bate would be in position to support them. Stewart's column had already passed by on the way toward the turnpike, and I presumed ut one and a fourth miles back on the road to Rutherford's Creek. I found General Stewart with General Hood. The commanding general there informed me that he had cood sent Major-General [Edward] Johnson, whose division had marched in rear of Stewart's corps, to report to me. I directed Major Bostick, of my staff, to place John
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Repelling Hood's invasion of Tennessee. (search)
division, on the 14th of November, General Schofield, though inferior in rank to Stanley, assumed command by virtue of being a department commander. The whole force gathered there was less than 18,000 men; while in front were some 5000 cavalry, consisting of a brigade of about 1500, under General Croxton, and a division of some 3500, under General Edward Hatch, the latter being fortunately intercepted while on his way to join Sherman. The Confederate army in three corps (S. D. Lee's, A. P. Stewart's, and B. F. Cheatham's) began its northward march from Florence on the 19th of November, in weather of great severity. It rained and snowed and hailed and froze, and the roads were almost impassable. Forrest had come up, with about six thousand cavalry, and led the advance with indomitable energy. Hatch and Croxton made such resistance as they could; but on the 22d the head of Hood's column was at Lawrenceburg, some 16 miles due west of Pulaski, Tennessee and on a road running direct
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Nashville, Dec. 15-16, 1864. (search)
Col. F. C. Zacharie; 30th La., Maj. A. Picolet; 4th La. Battalion, Capt. T. A. Bisland; 14th La. Battalion Sharp-shooters, Lieut. A. T. Martin. Holtzlaw's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. J. T. Holtzclaw: 18th Ala., Lieut.-Col. P. F. Hunley; 32d and 58th Ala., Col. Bushrod Jones; 36th Ala., Capt. N. M. Carpenter; 38th Ala., Capt. C. E. Bussey. Artillery Battalion (Eldridge's), Capt. C. E. Fenner: Ala. Battery, Capt. W. J. McKenzie; Miss. Bat'y, Lieut. J. S. McCall. Stewart's Corps (Polk's), Lieut.-Gen. A. P. Stewart. Loring's division, Maj.-Gen. W. W. Loring. Featherston's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. W. S. Featherston: 1st Miss., Capt. O. D. Hughes; 3d Miss., Capt. O. H. Johnston; 22d Miss., Maj. M. A. Oatis; 31st Miss., Capt. R. A. Collins; 33d Miss., Capt. T. L. Cooper; 40th Miss., Col. W. B. Colbert; 1st Miss. Batt'n, Maj. J. M. Stigler. Adams's Brigade, Col. Robert Lowry: 6th Miss., Lieut.-Col. Thomas J. Borden; 14th Miss., Col. W. L. Doss; 15th Miss., Lieut.-Col. J. R. Binford; 20th Miss.,
1 2