Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. You can also browse the collection for London (United Kingdom) or search for London (United Kingdom) in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Confederate cruisers. (search)
er the requirements of the commerce-destroying service: speed, sail-power, and sufficient strength for a battery and room for a crew. Such vessels were difficult to find, but Bulloch, by good luck, discovered one that answered his purpose,--the Sea King, a vessel built for the Bombay trade, which had made only one voyage; and in September she was purchased, her ostensible owner being a British subject who acted privately as Bulloch's agent. On the 8th of October the Sea King cleared from London for Bombay, carrying coal as ballast, and with Lieutenant Whittle of the Confederate navy on board as a passenger. On the same day the Laurel, a fast steamer, purchased ostensibly for a blockade-runner, sailed from Liverpool with a cargo containing six guns and their appurtenances, and nineteen passengers, who consisted of Captain James I. Waddell and eighteen other Confederate officers. The two vessels proceeded directly to Madeira. On their arrival they withdrew to the Desertas, a group
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 12.91 (search)
for our lives to that inherent trait in the English character, the desire to witness a passage at arms. That evening we landed in Southampton, and were received by the people with every demonstration of sympathy and kindly feeling. Thrown upon their shores by the chances of war, we were taken to their hearts and homes with that generous hospitality which brought to mind with tenderest feeling our own dear Southern homes in ante-bellum times. To the Rev. F. W. Tremlett, of Belsize Park, London, and his household, I am indebted for a picture of English home life that time cannot efface, and the memory of which will be a lasting pleasure till life's end. The United States screw-sloop Kearsarge at the time of the encounter with the Alabama. when the Kearsarge was at the Azores, a few months before the fight with the Alabama, Midshipman Edward E. Preble made a mathematically correct drawing of the ship, and from a photograph of that drawing the above picture was made. After the fig