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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 55 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 42 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 19 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 19 1 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 4 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1.. You can also browse the collection for Charles E. Hooker or search for Charles E. Hooker in all documents.

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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 4: seditious movements in Congress.--Secession in South Carolina, and its effects. (search)
that a panic arose about a few cases of small-pox in the city, and that we forthwith scampered off to Charleston, the effect would be a little ludicrous. The chivalry of South Carolina did scamper off to Charleston the next morning, December 18, 1860. where they were received with military honors, and at four o'clock in the afternoon re-assembled in Institute Hall. William Porcher miles. At the evening session in Columbia, before their flight, John A. Elmore, of Alabama, and Charles E. Hooker, of Mississippi, were introduced to the Convention as commissioners from their respective States. They successively addressed the Convention in favor of the immediate and unconditional secession of the State; and so anxious was Governor Moore, of Alabama, that South Carolina should not delay a moment, for fear of the people, that he telegraphed to Elmore as follows:--Tell the Convention to listen to no proposition of compromise or delay. The American Annual Cyclopedia, 1861, page 6
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 7: Secession Conventions in six States. (search)
a, L. W. Spratt; to Mississippi, M. L. Bonham; to Louisiana, J. L. Manning; to Arkansas, A. C. Spain; to Texas, J. B. Kershaw. Alabama.--To North Carolina, Isham W Garrett; to Mississippi, E. W. Pettus; to South Carolina, J. A. Elmore; to Maryland, A. F. Hopkins; to Virginia. Frank Gilmer; to Tennessee, L. Pope Walker; to Kentucky, Stephen F. Hale to Arkansas, John A. Winston. Georgia.--To Missouri, Luther J. Glenn; to Virginia, Henry L. Benning. Mississippi.--To South Carolina, C. E. Hooker; to Alabama, Joseph W. Matthews; to Georgia, William L. Harris; to Louisiana, Wirt Adams; to Texas, H. H. Miller; to Arkansas, Geo. R. Fall; to Florida, E. M. Yerger; to Tennessee, T. J. Wharton; to Kentucky, W. S. Featherstone; to North Carolina, Jacob Thompson; to Virginia, Fulton Anderson; to Maryland, A. H. Handy; to Delaware, Henry Dickinson; to Missouri,---Russell.--McPherson's Political History of the Great Rebellion, page 11. We have had glimpses of these Commissioners at several