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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 176 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 68 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 44 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 26 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 21 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 20 0 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 10 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 3, 1863., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 5 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for T. L. Crittenden or search for T. L. Crittenden in all documents.

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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 19: events in Kentucky and Northern Mississippi. (search)
orps, commanded respectively by Generals Gilbert, Crittenden, and McCook. General George H. Thomas, who was Bud space, its right under the immediate command of Crittenden, marching by way of Shepherdsville toward Bardstole in the morning, he sent for the flank corps of Crittenden and McCook to close up on his right and left, andwater caused half a day's delay in the arrival of Crittenden. Meanwhile Bragg, perceiving the threatened perifrom the State, and when informed of the delay of Crittenden, he resolved to give battle at once to the other 862. Buell at once sent them, and also orders for Crittenden, who was approaching, to hurry forward. The lattecisively in the conflict, Wagner's brigade of Crittenden's corps went into action on Mitchell's right justewal of the conflict in the morning. Gilbert and Crittenden moved early for that purpose, but during the nighstle River, in Rock Castle County. A division of Crittenden's corps was pushed on as far as Wild Cat and Lond
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 20: events West of the Mississippi and in Middle Tennessee. (search)
men), by the Franklin and Wilson's pike; and Crittenden, with three divisions (thirteen thousand twowart's Creek, five miles south of Lavergne, Crittenden was to attack them. Thomas was to come in orested at Triune that night. Dec. 27, 1862. Crittenden, in the mean time, had driven the Confederatn advanced brigade at Overall's Creek, while Crittenden, moving on the Murfreesboroa pike, with Palm the Confederates were evacuating the town. Crittenden was directed to send a division across the sidge in strong force on his front, whereupon Crittenden wisely took the responsibility of recalling ar as the river, and Van Cleve's division of Crittenden's force, was to fall upon Breckenridge and midan's right and rear, but it was too late. Crittenden had been ordered to suspend the operations o the edge of the stream. In the mean time Crittenden's chief of artillery had massed his batterie coming on, and rain was falling copiously. Crittenden's entire corps was thrown across the river, [3 more...]