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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 21: slavery and Emancipation.--affairs in the Southwest. (search)
We have already noticed the commissioning of so-called privateers by the Confederate Government, See page 872, volume I. and some of their piratical operations in the spring and summer of 1861. See pages 555 to 558, inclusive, volume I. Before the close of July, more than twenty of those depredators were afloat, and had captured millions of property belonging to American citizens. The most formidable and notorious of the sea-going ships of this character, were the Nashville, Captain R. B. Pegram, a Virginian, who had abandoned his flag, and the Sumter, Captain Raphael Semmes. The former was a side-wheel steamer, carried a crew of eighty men, and was armed with two long 12-pounder rifled cannon. Her career was short, but quite successful. She was finally destroyed by the Montauk, Captain Worden, Feb. 28, 1862. in the Ogeechee River. The appearance of the remains of the Nashville in the Ogeechee River is seen in the tail-piece on page 327. The career of the Sumter, which