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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 11: advance of the Army of the Potomac on Richmond. (search)
rilla bands, and resident bushwhackers had been active and mischievous; while Moseby, the marauding chief, was busy in the region east of the Blue Ridge, between Leesburg and the Rappahannock, which his followers called his Confederacy. So early as the beginning of January, 1864. Fitz-Hugh Lee, with his cavalry, made a fruitless raid on the Baltimore and Ohio railway, west of Cumberland. A little later, General Jubal Early, in command of the Confederates in the Shenandoah Valley, sent General Rosser on a foraging excursion in the same direction. He was more successful, for in Hardy County he captured Jan. 30. ninety-three Jubal Early. six-mule wagons heavily laden with supplies, twelve hundred cattle, and five hundred sheep, with two hundred and seventy men of the guard, who made only slight resistance. Four days later, he suddenly appeared Feb. 2. at Patterson's Creek Station, west of Cumberland, and captured a company of Union soldiers, but on his return he was struck a seve
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 12: operations against Richmond. (search)
Court-House, where he was attacked by a much larger force. After a contest, he was compelled to retrace his steps to Trevilian's, where he fought a sanguinary battle, and then withdrew. He swept around, by Spottsylvania Court-House and Guiney's Station, to White House, and rejoined Grant's army, having lost during his raid over seven hundred men, and captured nearly four hundred. He inflicted a loss of men upon the Confederates quite equal to his own. Among their killed was the active General Rosser. Grant continued moving slowly to the left, and keeping up the appearance of an intention to cross the Chickahominy and march on Richmond, until the evening of the 12th, June, 1864. when every thing was in readiness for the army to move to the James. White House was abandoned as a base of supplies; the rails and ties of the York River railway leading from it to Richmond were taken up and sent in barges to City Point, and the command of General Smith was re-embarked at the head of th
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 13: invasion of Maryland and Pennsylvania-operations before Petersburg and in the Shenandoah Valley. (search)
en in the above extract. He soon placed his forces behind Cedar Creek, about half way between Middletown and Strasburg, and made his Headquarters near, at the fine mansion of Benjamin B. Cooley. Early rallied his troops, and his cavalry, under Rosser, hung upon Sheridan's rear as he moved down the valley. At length the latter ordered Torbert with his cavalry to turn upon Rosser. It was done. Oct. 9 1864. At the first charge the Confederates broke and fled, leaving behind them over three huRosser. It was done. Oct. 9 1864. At the first charge the Confederates broke and fled, leaving behind them over three hundred prisoners, a dozen guns, and nearly fifty wagons. They were chased twenty-six miles. Three days later Early attempted to surprise Sheridan, who had halted near Fisher's Hill, when the Confederates were so severely chastised that it was supposed they would remain quiet for some time. With that impression Sheridan went to Washington on official business, leaving General Wright in temporary command of the army. The Nationals were so strongly posted on the east side of Cedar Creek, that t
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 20: Peace conference at Hampton Roads.--the campaign against Richmond. (search)
ad drawn the greater portion of the forces from the Shenandoah Valley the few Confederates in Northern Virginia, under Rosser, Moseby, and others, had been quite active during the winter. The former, with a mounted force, went over the mountains Staunton and the Rockfish Gap of the Blue Ridge. At Mount Crawford, on the Middle fork of the Shenandoah River, they met Rosser, with four hundred men, disposed to, dispute their passage of the stream. Colonel Capeheart dashed upon him, drove him across the River, and secured the bridge, which Rosser tried to burn behind him. the whole column now moved on to Staunton, and thence marched for Rockfish Gap, Custer in the advance. At Waynesboroa he found Early, behind strong intrenchments, wit was withdrawing his troops these were Pickett's division, Wise's independent brigade of infantry, and Fitzhugh Lee's, Rosser's, and W. H. Lee's commands. from the front of the Union cavalry, and felt quite at ease. The feeling at Headquarters wa