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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 198 2 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 75 1 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 68 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 66 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 60 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 60 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 28 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 23 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 20 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 19 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3.. You can also browse the collection for Decatur, Ga. (Georgia, United States) or search for Decatur, Ga. (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 14: Sherman's campaign in Georgia. (search)
st the Augusta railway, at some point east of Decatur, and near Stone Mountain. In obedience to erson struck the railway seven miles east of Decatur, on the 18th, July, 1864. and with Garrard'sck. At about the same time, Schofield seized Decatur. McPherson entered it on the 19th, when the le, rapidly diminishing in radius, moved from Decatur on the direct road to Atlanta. Logan's corpsarrard and his horsemen at Covington, between Decatur and View on the Atlanta battle-ground. te of one of the roads leading from Atlanta to Decatur, which did great execution on the 22d of Julyt. This tree was between the railway and the Decatur road, and the writer sketched it, in May, 186of the Tennessee from his extreme left on the Decatur road, to his extreme right on Proctor's Creeks. Sweeping around eastward again, he reached Decatur on the 22d, Aug., 1864. and on the same day e direction of West Point, and Schofield near Decatur. The commander-in-chief made his Headquarter[1 more...]
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 15: Sherman's March to the sea.--Thomas's campaign in Middle Tennessee.--events in East Tennessee. (search)
e March on Millen, 410. March from Millen to Savannah, 411. capture of Fort McAllister, 412. evacuation of Savannah, 413. the National troops in Savannah, 414. raids in the Mississippi region, 415. Forrest in Tennessee, 416. Hood menacing Decatur, 417. Forrest helping Hood, 418. Hood in Tennessee, 419. Schofield retreats before Hood to Nashville, 420. battle of Franklin, 421. the battle-field of Franklin, 422. a patriotic Tennessee matron, 423. Hood invests Nashville, 424. Genera City. Then that army became an isolated moving column, in the heart of the enemy's country. It moved on the morning of the 14th, Howard's wing marching by way of Macdonough for Gordon, on the railway east of Macon, and Slocum's by the town of Decatur, for Madison and Milledgeville. Then, by Sherman's order, and under the direction of Captain O. M. Poe, chief engineer, the entire city of Atlanta (which, next to Richmond, had furnished more war materials for the Confederates than any in the S
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 19: the repossession of Alabama by the Government. (search)
e region of Crawfordsville, the home of Stephens, the Vice-President of the Confederacy, whose house we saw on an eminence to the right. As we approached Atlanta, we noticed many evidences of the devastating hand of Sherman, when he began his march to the sea, in the ruins of railway stations, twisted iron rails, and charred ties, along the road-side. Toward evening the grand dome of Stone Mountain, a heap of granite fifteen hundred feet in height, loomed up a mile or so north of us. From Decatur onward, the earth-works of both parties were seen in thickening lines, and at twilight we were in the midst of the ruined city of Atlanta, then showing some hopeful signs of resurrection from its ashes. We passed a rainy day in Atlanta, the writer leaving the examination of the intrenchments and the battle-fields around it until a second visit, See page 404. which he intended to make a few weeks later, and on the morning of the 8th, April, 1866. in chilling, cheerless air, we departe