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Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 38 0 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 10 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 8 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 6 6 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 28, 1862., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 6 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 22, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 8, 1861., [Electronic resource] 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.). You can also browse the collection for Lloyd or search for Lloyd in all documents.

Your search returned 19 results in 5 document sections:

Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Advertisement (search)
. A little later came Grimoard, Guibert and Lloyd: the first two caused progress to be made in tch added nothing to the first notions given by Lloyd. At the same time appeared also in Germany, ues upon a single wing of the hostile army; and Lloyd soon came to fortify me in this conviction. Iwork of Bulow, and the historical narrative of Lloyd, translated by Roux-Fazillac, having then faller, events often separated by a whole century; Lloyd especially convinced me that the critical and giving the sequel of the seven years war which Lloyd had not finished. This mode suited me all theo the basis of the strategic science, of which Lloyd and Bulow had first raised the veil, and of wh imperfect sketch of the Seven Years War which Lloyd has given, none of the military writers had co events with those principles. Feuquieres and Lloyd had indicated the road without having had many vague, in what he calls the dialetics of war. Lloyd has gone fartherest into the question; but how
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 2: military policy, or the philosophy of war. (search)
n the conduct of a war, there are others which, without belonging to diplomacy, are none the more combinations of strategy or of tactics. We could then give them no denomination more rational than that of military policy or philosophy of war. Lloyd has well treated this subject in the 2d and 3d parts of his Memoirs; his chapters on the General and on the Passions are remarkable; the 4th part is also interesting; but it wants completeness, and his points of view are not always just. The Marod army, nor a national defense. Let us return to the necessity of being well acquainted with the geography and military statistics of an empire. Those sciences are wanting, it is true, in elementary treatise, and remain yet to be developed. Lloyd, who has made on them an essay in the fifth part of his Memoirs, in describing the frontiers of the great states of Europe has not been happy in his sayings and his predictions; he sees obstacles everywhere; he presents, among others, as impregna
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 3: strategy. (search)
tual strategic lines, as to that of lines of operations. These definitions sufficiently prove how much my ideas differ from those of the authors who have preceded me. Indeed those lines have been considered under their material relations only: Lloyd and Bulow gave them but a relative value to the magazines and the depots of armies; the latter has even asserted, that there were no longer any lines of operations when an army encamped near its magazines. The following example will suffice to de Inn, which separated Bavaria from Austria; flanked on the south by the Tyrolean Alps, on the north by the mountains of Bohemia and by the Danube, its front, which is not extensive, is found covered by the places of Passau, Braunau and Salsburg. Lloyd compares, somewhat poetically, this frontier to two impregnable bastions, the curtain of which. formed by three fine places, has for ditch one of the most impetuous of rivers; but he has exaggerated a little those material advantages, for the ep
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 5: of different mixed operations, which participate at the same time of strategy and.of tactics. (search)
rest, the same for all countries having double fronts of operations. In all these calculations I suppose the forces nearly equal, if the invading army is twice as strong, then it may follow with the half of its troops that which retires parallelly, and carry the other half upon the capital; but with equal forcos that would be impossible. Austria would not perhaps have the same advantages, because of the direction of the Rhetian and Tyrolean Alps and the course of the Danube; in truth Lloyd, considering Bohemia and the Tyrol as two bastions of which the line of the Inn forms the formidable curtain, seems on the contrary to present this frontier as the more advantageous for being defended by lateral movements. This assertion has received, as we have said, cruel denials in the campaigns of 1800, 1805 and 1809, but as the lateral defense has not been precisely well attempted there, the question is still susceptible of controversy. All depends in my opinion upon respective situ
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), chapter 7 (search)
opinion farther on. In the meantime we must not be misunderstood; it is no longer the question now to dispute whether Lloyd was right in wishing to give to the infantry a fourth rank armed with pikes, to the end of offering a greater shock in mo a fourth rank would add to this embarrassment, without adding the least thing to their strength. It is astonishing that Lloyd, who had made war, should have insisted so much upon this material force; for the contact is very rarely sufficiently closs extent of front: the difficulty of the jointing of the two middle ranks, amply makes up for this slight difference. Lloyd has not been much more happy in the choice of the means which he proposes for diminishing the inconvenience of narrowing rthian, and returns to the combat with the same vivacity, limiting itself to harrassing the enemy by individual attacks. Lloyd has pronounced for the negative, and several exploits of the Cossacks against the excellent French cavalry seems to confi