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Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 32 0 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 18 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.). You can also browse the collection for Eylau (Russia) or search for Eylau (Russia) in all documents.

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Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 2: military policy, or the philosophy of war. (search)
ces. Superiority of armament may augment the chances of success in war; it does not of itself gain battles, but it contributes to it. Every one recollects how the great inferiority of the French in artillery came near becoming fatal to them at Eylau, and at Marengo. It is recollected also, what the French heavy cavalry have gained in adopting the cuirass, which it had so long repulsed; each one knows finally, of what advantage is the lance; doubtless lancers as foragers are no better than h direction; the schrapnell shells, which launch floods of grape to the range of the ball; steam guns of Perkins, which vomit as many balls as a battalion, are going to centuple perhaps the chances of carnage, as if the hecatombs of the species of Eylau, of Borodino, of Leipzig, and of Waterloo, were not sufficient for desolating the European populations. If sovereigns do not unite in congress to proscribe those inventions of death and destruction, there will remain no other course to take th
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 3: strategy. (search)
ers of Gallicia, prolonged to the Narew, formed, with the line of the Vistula, the contracted side Bd. The manner in which Napoleon manoeuvred before the battle of Eylau, was absolutely the same as that which is found traced; a fortuitous incident prevented him from obtaining from it all the success which he expected, but his manoe0, for the Army Fg, since it would procure the possession of two sides of the strategic échiquier. The front of operations which Napoleon adopted in his march upon Eylau presented all these peculiarities: his pivots of operations were at Warsaw and at Thorn, which made of the Vistula a sort of temporary base; the front of operationsay, it is indispensable that this base be prolonged far behind the strategic front and be found covered by it: Napoleon marching from the Narew by Allenstein upon Eylau, had behind his left the place of Thorn, and, farther still from the front of the army, the tete de pont of Praga and Warsaw; so that his communications were perfe
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 4: grand tactics, and battles. (search)
two masses upon his centre and his right, refusing his left, which he wished to repeat at Borodino, as well as at Waterloo before the arrival of the Prussians. At Eylau, although the encounter was almost unforeseen on account of the unlooked for offensive return of the Russian army, he outflanked the left almost perpendicularly, woops, without the chief of the army being able to ar-rogate to himself the least part in the success of the day, but a victory like those of Lutzen, of Luzzara, of Eylau, of Abensberg, can be the result only of a great character, joined to great presence of mind, and to wise combinations. There is too much of chance and too muchre more rare and more difficult, for, in order to premeditate them, it is necessary to know precisely the situation of the hostile camp. At Marengo, at Lutzen, at Eylau, there were a kind of surprises, but these were in reality only unexpected attacks to which this name cannot be given. The only great surprise that we could cite,
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), chapter 7 (search)
t. General Benningsen had cause to congratulate himself at Eylau for having united fifty-eight pieces in reserve, for they ch Napoleon employed at the Tagliamento, and the Russians at Eylau; their regiments of three battalions deployed one in first ould expect the most advantages; the battles of Marengo, of Eylau, of Borodino, and ten others, have proved this. Meanwhil its fire; the corps of Augereau had a cruel proof of it at Eylau, and the left of the Austrians experienced the same fate aten by its first successes; a fine charge of the Russians at Eylau, and the English cavalry at Waterloo proved this. Finally,ing it, as the French cavalry so bravely defended itself at Eylau; but let infantry and artillery march upon it after having uccess of armies, was given by Napoleon after the battle of Eylau; the cruel losses which his troops sustained by the fire ofnst the famous column of Macdonald; the system employed at Cannae by Hannibal, could all the better find here its applicatio