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Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 16 16 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.) 5 5 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 3 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 3 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 3 3 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 2 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 2 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. 2 2 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Emil Schalk, A. O., The Art of War written expressly for and dedicated to the U.S. Volunteer Army.. You can also browse the collection for 1100 AD or search for 1100 AD in all documents.

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Emil Schalk, A. O., The Art of War written expressly for and dedicated to the U.S. Volunteer Army., Example of a battle of the offensive defense: battle of Austerlitz, December 2, 1805. (search)
t, with the bayonet alone, to prevent cavalry breaking the ranks of infantry. However, it must be stated that cavalry should generally only charge infantry in disorder or while marching, as in acting against infantry which is not so, and which has time to form in squares, its loss is heavy and unnecessary. Artillery never acts alone; it is always accompanied by one of the two other arms. Smooth-bored guns open fire at about 1600 to 1100 yards; at these distances shots are fired: from 1100 to 1400 yards, and, if the ground permits it, they are fired by ricochet, or rolled; from 600 to 1200 yards, spherical case or shrapnels; and under 600 yards, canister is fired. Against deployed lines, shrapnel and canister, and against columns, shrapnel and shot are the most advantageous. Rifled guns commence firing sooner; the projectiles used are shells, shrapnels, and canister, the last only at short distances. When acting against artillery of the enemy, our batteries should be d