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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book 38 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life 22 0 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 18 0 Browse Search
Matthew Arnold, Civilization in the United States: First and Last Impressions of America. 16 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 14 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 12 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 12 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 12 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 12 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Women and Men 9 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Matthew Arnold, Civilization in the United States: First and Last Impressions of America.. You can also browse the collection for Matthew Arnold or search for Matthew Arnold in all documents.

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America. Then our Boston friend turns to me again, says that it is vulgar people from the large cities who have given Mr. Arnold his dislike of American manners, and adds, that if it should ever happen that hard destiny should force Mr. Arnold to cMr. Arnold to cross the Atlantic, I should find in the smaller cities of the interior, in the northern, middle, and southwestern states, an elegant and simple social order, as entirely unknown in England, Germany, or Italy, as the private life of the dukes or princfrom the example of the people of the United States. I go back again to my Boston newspaper:-- In towns whose names Mr. Arnold never heard, and never will hear, there will be found almost invariably a group of people of good taste, good manners, . It is they who maintain the national credit, it is they who steadily improve the standard of national education. If Mr. Arnold should ever see them in their own homes, it is they who will show him what is the normal type of American manners.
Matthew Arnold, Civilization in the United States: First and Last Impressions of America., IV: civilization in the United States. (search)
kings. By tickings we are to understand news conveyed through the tickings of the telegraph. The first ticking was: Matthew Arnold is sixty-two years old --an age, I must just say in passing, which I had not then reached. The second ticking was: W Then a Chicago paper is sent to me; and what I have the pleasure of reading, as the result of my contradiction, is this: Arnold denies; Mr. Medill [my old friend] refuses to accept Arnold's disclaimer; says Arnold is a cur. I once declared that iArnold's disclaimer; says Arnold is a cur. I once declared that in England the born lover of ideas and of light could not but feel that the sky over his head is of brass and iron. And so I say that, in America, he who craves for the interesting in civilization, he who requires from what surrounds him satisfactionArnold is a cur. I once declared that in England the born lover of ideas and of light could not but feel that the sky over his head is of brass and iron. And so I say that, in America, he who craves for the interesting in civilization, he who requires from what surrounds him satisfaction for his sense of beauty, his sense for elevation, will feel the sky over his head to be of brass and iron. The human problem, then, is as yet solved in the United States most imperfectly; a great void exists in the civilization over there; a want o