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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 11 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 9, 1862., [Electronic resource] 10 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 9 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 7 1 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 6 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 11, 1865., [Electronic resource] 3 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 17, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 6, 1863., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. You can also browse the collection for J. T. Boyle or search for J. T. Boyle in all documents.

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ce, under Gen. J. R. Chalmers, first encountered Sept. 13. a considerable force at Munfordsville, where the railroad crosses Green river, and where Col. J. T. Wilder, with about 2,100 men, had assumed command five days before, by order of Gen. J. T. Boyle, commanding, in Kentucky, and had hastily thrown up fortifications, with intent to dispute the passage of the river. Chalmers had already sent a mounted force to the north of Munfordsville, by which a first demand for surrender was made at ext morning, but speedily repulsed with loss. At 9 A. M., Wilder was reenforced by six companies of the 50th Indiana, Col. C. L. Dunham, who, being his senior, after hesitating, assumed command; but was superseded soon afterward by an order from Boyle, and Wilder restored. The Rebels, after their first repulse, kept mainly out of sight, knowing that their ultimate success was inevitable, and allowed two more regiments and six guns to make their way into the town; assured that all who were t
Xxxiii. The repossession of Alabama. Wilson at Eastport, Miss. crosses the Tennessee, and moves southward routs Roddy at Montevallo Hurries Forrest from Boyle's creek charges over the defenses of Selma, and takes 2,700 prisoners Montgomery surrenders Lagrange routs Buford Wilson takes Columbus, Ga., by assault Lagrange charges and captures Fort Tyler Wilson in Macon Cuxton captures Tuskaloosa zigzags to Macon Canby in New Orleans advances on Mobile Steele moves up from ish; burning the Scottsboroa factory and Centerville bridge, and rejoining Wilson near Selma. Wilson was moving eagerly and in force on Selma, driving small parties of Rebel cavalry, when he was brought to a halt by Forrest, strongly posted on Boyle's creek, near Plantersville, with a creek on his right and a high, wooded ridge on his left, with 4 guns planted to sweep the Randolph and 2 on the Maplesville road, whereon our troopers were advancing. He had in line about 5,000 men, mainly cav