hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 6 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 15, 1864., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 28, 1865., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. 3 1 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. 3 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 15, 1865., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington. You can also browse the collection for Allison or search for Allison in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 1 document section:

William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington, Chapter 5: casualties compared with those of European wars — loss in each arm of the service — deaths from disease — classification of deaths by causes. (search)
The two great battles of the age, in point of loss, are Waterloo and Gettysburg. Between them there is a remarkable similarity, both in numbers engaged and extent of casualties. At Waterloo, the French numbered 80,000 men, and 252 guns; Allison. the Allies numbered 72,000 men, and 186 guns. At Gettysburg, the Union Army numbered 82,000 men, and 300 guns; The Comte de Paris, in his history of the war, estimates that the union army had only 82,000 actually on the field. Gen. Meade'sle since the introduction of gunpowder. The casualties in that battle have been variously stated: The Encyclopedia Brittannica puts the Russian loss at 30,000 in killed, wounded, and prisoners, and the French loss at considerably above 20,000. Allison gives the losses at Borodino in round numbers only, placing the French loss at 50,000, and the Russian at 45,000. The most credible statement is found in the Journal of The London Statistical Society, which places the number of killed and wound