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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 703 687 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 558 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 529 203 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 90 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 83 23 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 81 23 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 68 0 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 66 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 62 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 54 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz). You can also browse the collection for Spottsylvania (Virginia, United States) or search for Spottsylvania (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 15 results in 4 document sections:

Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 4 (search)
east and west along the plank and pike, and the south, nearly to Spotsylvania, is called The Wilderness, a most appropriate term — a land of air works and were crowding down the Parker's Store road, towards Spotsylvania — each moment worth untold gold to them! Grant had no longer a ts and had something cooked. Meanwhile there was firing towards Spotsylvania, an ill omen for us. The Rebels were there first and stood acrosand lost a golden opportunity, for Wilson's cavalry had occupied Spotsylvania, but of course could not keep there unless the enemy were driveneral easterly and westerly direction, a mile and a half north of Spotsylvania. There was a high and curving ridge on which was placed our sece 8th. On Monday, the 9th, early, Burnside was to come down the Spotsylvania and Fredericksburg road to the Gate, thus approaching on the ext Rebel columns were still moving down the Parker's Store road to Spotsylvania, and we could not be sure they would not come in on our right fl
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), IV. Cold Harbor (search)
IV. Cold Harbor [After Spotsylvania the Confederate Army was gradually forced back on Richmond. At Cool Arbor, or Cold Harbor as it is usually called, almost in spite of all this the result has been almost ludicrous! Some places (e.g. Spotsylvania) are from one to two miles out of position, and the roads run everywhere excem up, the Chickahominy lay behind them; but I had no more hope of it, after Spotsylvania, than I had of takings Richmond in two days. Half-past 4 found us at Kelly'sh assaulting, this campaign! After our lessons of failure and of success at Spotsylvania, we assault here, after the enemy had had thirty-six hours to entrench, and ul facts. Little Governor Sprague appeared again. He was last with us at Spotsylvania. This time he came over with Birney, who, with his thin, pale, Puritanic farness the 6th Corps would have been stronger without Ricketts's division; at Spotsylvania the whole army would have been stronger without Mott's division. Howland
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 8 (search)
with me did you know what power and what men Grant has had to command. Meade's great virtue is, that he knows when to fight, and when not to fight. Taking up an army on the march, he fought and won the greatest battle of this war — Gettysburg--100,000 men against 110,000--a battle that saved Baltimore, Washington, and Philadelphia, and nobody knows what besides. He wouldn't fight (assault) Lee at Williamsport, and immediately he was timid, timid, timid! Now look here: we assaulted at Spotsylvania, at Cool Arbor, at Petersburg, and were repulsed with perfect slaughter; after all that, if Lee had assaulted us in position what would, what would have become of him? Why, we would have used him up so, that he wouldn't have known himself. Just turn this about and apply it to Gettysburg and reflect how the people are frequently semi-idiotic! He followed Lee to the Rappahannock and got orders to stop. In September he was to move and attack Lee on the Rapid Ann; the day before this move
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), Index (search)
6, 305; reflects on Army of the Potomac, 126; described, 327. Shot, behavior of round, 149. Sickles, Daniel Edgar, 60. Sleeper, Jacob Henry, 49, 225, 266; resigns, 310. Sleeping-car, 229. Slocum, Henry Warner, 22. Smith, William Farrar, 136, 137, 143, 160; described, 140; lunch, 148; before Petersburg, 161, 164n; Butler and, 192. Smyth, Henry Augustus, 275. Snyder, —, 72. Soldier, qualities of a great, 163. Spaulding, Ira, 311. Spaulding, —, 26. Spies, Rebel, 244. Spotsylvania, operations near, 104. Sprague, William, 75, 115, 188. Stanhope, Arthur Philip, Lord Mahon, 241. Stanton, Edwin MeMasters, 234, 247, 248, 264, 266; daughter, 314. Starr, James, 104. Stephenson, Sussex Vane, captain, 49. Steuart, George H., 111. Stevenson, Thomas Greely, 95, 116. Stony Creek station, 285. Stragglers and pillaging, 117, 331; Barlow and, 157; Warren and, 291. Stuart, James Ewell Brown, 18; death, 125. Summerhayes, John Wyer, 268. Sumner, Charles, 78. S