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the quick, and mighty rustling of their feet, And in the flashing of their eyes, 'twas proved This was enough. Men, whose every bosom held a noble heart, And who had left their homes, their sacred rights To gain: To these, this was no trying hour, No time to waver, and to doubt — but one For which they'd hoped and prayed-- One (as they felt) they'd brought not on Themselves, but which they knew must come-- And nobly, O most nobly, did their Bravery, their sense of right, sustain them. And Lincoln's hordes-- They knew not with what natures they contended-- Seemed not to feel their motives differed, as Does heaven from earth. They, the poor, miserable, hired outcasts, whose Principles were bought, And men, whose courage, bravery, and noble aims Had come to be, throughout the land, A proverb. And what the end? What could, what should it be, than what it was? A brilliant, glorious victory. The South weeps o'er her slain; And well she may; for they were jewels From her diadem. She weeps
The battle in Virginia. Summary. Manassas Races, July 18 and 21. Bull Run Course, Virginia--Match, Secession v. Union. Jeff. Davis enters colt Confederate, ridden by Beauregard,11 Abo Lincoln enters bl. g. Union, ridden by Scott,22 Time, 5h.--12h. --N. O. Picayune.
A mixed regiment.--When the Tiger Rifles, who played such havoc with Lincoln's Pet lambs at Manassas, on the memorable 21st July, passed through this city, we thought that we had seen a specimen of the roughest and most ferocious set of men on earth; but when we speak of the Tenth Louisiana regiment, of New Orleans, which passed through this city on Sunday, language is inadequate to give a description, composed as it was of English, French, Germans, Dutch, Italians, Sicilians, Spaniards, Portuguese, Swiss, Mexicans, Indians, and Creoles, who, in their jabbering, seemed to represent a second Babel. The commander, together with many other officers, are veterans who served throughout the Crimean war. The commands are given in French, Dutch, Spanish, or something else which we could not exactly understand, but seemed to be executed with promptness and a remarkable degree of precision. The Mexicans, particularly, were objects of much curiosity with our citizens, most of whom had never
Washington, June 24.--A private letter from Minister Corwin, Mexico, 10th, says it is reported through secession channels, that Lincoln was driven from Washington, and Gen. Scott is at the head of the Confederate army.--Sandusky Register, June 25.
outhern Confederacy, and admitted by him, and for an attempt to take the life of Lieut. Carruthers when under arrest. Brown & Laidler, T. J. Mcgriff. S. M. Manning, H. H. Whitehead. And others. All papers in the South please copy. Accompanying the above, The Confederacy makes the following statement:-- We clip the following from The Pulaski Times, published at Hawkinsville in this State. Martin resided some eight miles east of that place. It appears that he said that, If Lincoln would march his forces through the Southern States, he would link his destiny with him, and that if the war continued five years, he would be as rich as he wanted to be; that there were tories who got rich in the Revolutionary war, and that he would do so in this. Lieut. Carruthers was despatched to arrest him, and he gave himself up, acknowledging that he had used the language with which he was charged. Lieut. Carruthers took him in a buggy to carry him to Hawkinsville for trial. He w
ng any one a civil answer. Old Abe, it is said, is absolutely afraid to go near Fuss and feathers, as the latter has not forgotten, and never will, the remark of Lincoln to Rev. Dr. Fuller, that he was Scott's legal master. Scott, who was present at the time of the interview, managed to restrain his passion until the doctor and the members of the Young Men's Christian Association left; but they had scarcely cleared the room before he let out on Lincoln. At one time it was thought that Cameron and Seward would have to interfere to prevent a personal collision. Scott raved like a madman, and told Lincoln that he was a stupid fool, a most consummate ass, anLincoln that he was a stupid fool, a most consummate ass, and lavished sundry other choice epithets upon the devoted head of his legal master. Our informant states that he finally worked himself up into such a passion, that his nervous system could no longer stand the shock, and he was conveyed to bed.--Petersburg (Va.) Express.
ith Merryman, Habeas Corpus, and Kane. And as for that crabbed old dotart, Judge Taney, For much I would put him on board of the Pawnee, And make his decisions a little more curt; For the panic's fictitious, and nobody's hurt! And now I'll just say what I'd have you to do In order to put your new President through: First, four hundred millions is wanted by Chase, He cannot run longer the Government's face; And Cameron wants, for the use of old Scott, Some three hundred thousand more men than he's got. Then sixty new iron-plate ships to stand shells Are loudly demanded (must have 'em) by Welles; For England, the bully, won't stand our blockade, And insists that we shall not embarrass her trade. But who fears the British? I'll speedily tune 'em As sure as my name is E Pluribus Unum, For I am myself the whole United States, Constitution, and Laws, (if you doubt it, ask Bates.) The Star-Spangled Banner's my holiday shirt-- Hurrah for Abe Lincoln, there's nobody hurt! --Baltimore South.
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore), Abe Lincoln assassinated!--arrest of the assassin!--great excitement! (search)
Abe Lincoln assassinated!--arrest of the assassin!--great excitement! Washington, August 7, 10 A. M.--Abe Lincoln was shot through the heart last night, just as he was entering his carriage, after leaving his cabinet in consultation. The assassin, a Southerner, is now in the hands of the authorities. There is great excitement, and On to Richmond! is the cry. later.--11 A. M.--Abe is still alive, but there is no chance for him to survive. The excitement here is great. still later.Abe Lincoln was shot through the heart last night, just as he was entering his carriage, after leaving his cabinet in consultation. The assassin, a Southerner, is now in the hands of the authorities. There is great excitement, and On to Richmond! is the cry. later.--11 A. M.--Abe is still alive, but there is no chance for him to survive. The excitement here is great. still later.--12 M.--Abe was wounded in the abdomen and not in the heart. His physician thinks he will recover. The excitement is abating. later still.--1 P. M.--It is now currently reported that Abe was only slightly wounded in the leg. No excitement. the latest.--2 P. M.--An investigation now proves that the bullet intended for Abe's heart missed its mark, and only killed one of his footmen. The people are returning to their business. later still.--3. P. M.--Abe's footman was not killed, as
A song sung in Norfolk. Jeff. Davis is a brave man, He will lead the Southern force, I pity Lincoln's soldiers, For I fear they will fare worse; He will show the Union shrickers, The Union it is done-- The secession flag, ere many months, Will wave o'er Washington! Jeff. Davis in the White House, What glorious news 't will be! Abe Lincoln in an inglorious flight, In a baggage car we'll see; With Seward as conductor, General Scott as engineer, Old Hicks, the traitor governor, Following panting in the rear.
e, till your country shall be Entirely redeemed as the home of the free. Yet Bunker Hill's State, as of old in its zeal, The foremost responds to our nation's appeal, While first upon Liberty's altar to mourn The sons of her pride, by foul treachery torn. They gather! they gather! &c. They've roused the old lion, Scott, out of his lair; No claw lined with cotton for Dixie is there! He'll chase that fox, Davis, in front of his host, And send him with Haman to wander, twin ghost; While President Lincoln is valiant and bold, To deal with opposers, like Abra'am of old; His sword upon tyrants the patriarch drew, Redeeming his kinsman--our Abra'am will too! They gather! they gather! &c. Our country is calling; wake, sons of the true! The storm of Fort Sumter was thundered at you; Each shell that whizzed there, and each traitorous gun, Was aimed at the banners your fathers have won. Then gather! then gather! &c. Yet pause in your songs, let the banners float low, Half-mast o'er the tur
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