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Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 5: Baltimore and Fortress Monroe. (search)
is something unusual at least, and I am so poor a soldier as not to understand it otherwise than in the light of a reproof. At least, I desire a personal interview with you and with the President before I accept further service. This will be handed to you by my friend and aide-de-camp, R. S. Fay, Jr., who knows its contents, and is able to represent me fully to you. Very truly yours, Benj. F. Butler, Brigadier-General Commanding. After I got to Fortress Monroe I waited from the 22d of May till the 4th day of June, when, the order not arriving making North Carolina a part of my department, I wrote General Scott as follows:-- headquarters Department of Virginia, Fortress Monroe, Va., June 4, 1861. Lieutenant-General Scott, Washington, D. C.: General:--I beg leave further to call the attention of the lieutenant-general to the fact that from some oversight, probably in the adjutant-general's office, the orders creating the Department of Virginia, North and South Carolin
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 15: operations of the Army of the James around Richmond and Petersburg. (search)
ps being withdrawn from Bermuda Hundred. Those sixteen thousand men under Smith were of no earthly advantage to Grant. It would have been very much more to his advantage if he had not had them, as without them he probably would not have made the fight at Cold Harbor. That fight was simply an indiscriminate slaughter of our men to the number of eighteen thousand, and more than three thousand were of the troops I had sent,--and better officers and soldiers never stood in line. On the 22d of May, Fitzhugh Lee was sent to capture Wilson's Wharf, Fort Pocahontas. As has been already stated, the place was seized when we went up the river, so that our transports should not be stopped. Fitzhugh Lee thought that with his cavalry, infantry, and artillerymen, amounting to some twenty-five hundred men, he could easily capture that place, which was held only by two regiments of negroes under General Wilde. Accordingly, before he began, he sent a summons to surrender, informing the comm