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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 105 5 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 100 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 95 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 72 6 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 71 7 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 70 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 67 9 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 52 2 Browse Search
L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion 50 0 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 47 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman .. You can also browse the collection for Gordon Granger or search for Gordon Granger in all documents.

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William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, Chapter 8: from the battle of Bull Run to Paducah--Kentucky and Missouri. 1861-1862. (search)
tism and zeal. I advised him what to read and study, was considerably amused at his receiving instruction from a young lieutenant who knew the company and battalion drill, and could hear him practise in his room the words of command, and tone of voice, Break from the right, to march to the left! Battalion, halt! For ward into line! etc. Of course I made a favorable report in his case. Among the infantry and cavalry colonels were some who afterward rose to distinction — David Stuart, Gordon Granger, Bussey, etc., etc. Though it was mid-winter, General Halleck was pushing his preparations most vigorously, and surely he brought order out of chaos in St. Louis with commendable energy. I remember, one night, sitting in his room, on the second floor of the Planters' House, with him and General Cullum, his chief of staff, talking of things generally, and the subject then was of the much-talked — of advance, as soon as the season would permit. Most people urged the movement down the
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, chapter 15 (search)
h the railroad between Cleveland and Dalton. Granger will move up the south side of the Tennessee dently determined to starve the garrison out. Granger is on the way to Burnside's relief, but I havwhat force to take with you from that point. Granger has his corps with him, from which you will sivisions, on the morning of the 6th, with General Granger and some of my staff I rode into Knoxvillto capture much of his artillery and trains. Granger was present at our conversation, and most unr only to include the 3d of December; that General Granger had left Chattanooga for Knoxville by thewing him in the river; but he feared that General Granger could not reach Knoxville in time, and orad five miles, there to await notice that General Granger was on a parallel road abreast of him, an portion of your command but the corps of General Granger necessary for operations in this section; troops now here, save those commanded by General Granger, should return at once to within supporti[12 more...]
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 17 (search)
was General Schofield. He returned with us to Chattanooga, stopping by the way a few hours at Loudon, where were the headquarters of the Fourth Corps (Major-General Gordon Granger). General Granger, as usual, was full of complaints at the treatment of his corps since I had left him with General Burnside, at Knoxville, the precediGeneral Granger, as usual, was full of complaints at the treatment of his corps since I had left him with General Burnside, at Knoxville, the preceding November; and he stated to me personally that he had a leave of absence in his pocket, of which he intended to take advantage very soon. About the end of March, therefore, the three army commanders and myself were together at Chattanooga. We had nothing like a council of war, but conversed freely and frankly on all matters of Twelfth Corps (Howard and Slocum) into a single corps, to be commanded by General Jos. Hooker. General Howard was to be transferred to the Fourth Corps, vice Gordon Granger to avail himself of his leave of absence; and General Slocum was to be ordered down the Mississippi River, to command the District of Vicksburg. These change
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 20 (search)
gration. The rebel General Wheeler was still in Middle Tennessee, threatening our railroads, and rumors came that Forrest was on his way from Mississippi to the same theatre, for the avowed purpose of breaking up our railroads and compelling us to fall back from our conquest. To prepare for this, or any other emergency, I ordered Newton's division of the Fourth Corps back to Chattanooga, and Corse's division of the Seventeenth Corps to Rome, and instructed General Rousseau at Nashville, Granger at Decatur, and Steadman at Chattanooga, to adopt the most active measures to protect and insure the safety of our roads. Hood still remained about Lovejoy's Station, and, up to the 15th of September, had given no signs of his future plans; so that with this date I close the campaign of Atlanta, with the following review of our relative losses during the months of August and September, with a summary of those for the whole campaign, beginning May 6 and ending September 15, 1864. The los