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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 65 11 Browse Search
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 57 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 39 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 22 4 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 21 1 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 20 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 18 2 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 9 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 9 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for John L. Worden or search for John L. Worden in all documents.

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se them of this idea, and assured them that he came to give them protection, and be-sought them to cease inflicting injury on them-selves by setting fire to their beautiful village. A prominent physician came to the dock, and sought a conversation with Capt. Rowan, who repeated these assurances, which had the effect to cause them to stay the further application of the torch. But several of the best buildings were already in flames, among them the court-house. An application was made to Capt. Worden to assist in putting out the flames, but as his fleet embraced but a limited number of men, and as his own boats might in, their absence be fired; and in addition to this, there being but little prospect, since the insane rebels had rendered worthless the hose by cutting it, of accomplishing more than drawing upon him the lie that he had fired the village, he properly declined to allow his men to go ashore. He was visited by several Union men, one of whom assured him that there were thre
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 82.-fight in Hampton roads, Va., March 8th and 9th, 1862. (search)
It was the impression of some of my officers, that the rebels hoisted the French flag, but I heard that the Monitor had arrived, and soon after Lieut. Commanding Worden came on board, and I immediately ordered him to go up to the Minnesota, hoping she would be able to keep off an attack on the Minnesota till we had got her afloat but without avail, and as the tide had then fallen considerably, I suspended further proceedings at that time. At two A. M. the iron battery Monitor, Com. John L. Worden, which had arrived the previous evening at Hampton Roads, came alongside and reported for duty, and then all on board felt that we had a friend that would stas fought, part of the time touching each other, from eight A. M. to noon, when the Merrimac retired. Whether she is injured or not it is impossible to say. Lieut. J. L. Worden, who commanded the Monitor, handled her with great skill, assisted by Chief-Engineer Stimers. Lieut. Worden was injured by the cement from the pilot-house b
than from the St. Lawrence to the Gulf, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific. In the name of this vast assembly, once more he gave thanks to them all. Let us rejoice that these men went down fighting to the last, and that when they went down they left the Star-Spangled Banner of the Cumberland flying at her peak; the emblem that no dangers, no perils, no enemies, no treasons, not ocean itself could destroy our liberty. [Loud applause.] Three cheers were given for Capt. Ericsson, for Lieut. Worden, and for the President. Mr Kearney of the Congress then sang a humorous song in praise of the yacht America, the curiosity and astonishment of John Bull being represented by the chorus: Oh! where did she come from? New-York Town. Who's the Captain of her? One Mr. Brown: which the crew sang with great gusto. The satisfaction of the audience found huge and prolonged manifestation, and the jolly tar was called back. He sang the first verse of Uncle Sam is rich enough to give us al