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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Ruth N. Cromwell or search for Ruth N. Cromwell in all documents.

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urge, Send greetings to it o'er the surge, And comfort and protect it. But yesterday you scarce could Shake, In slave-abhorring rigor, Our Northern palms, for conscience‘ sake; To-day you clasp the hands that ache With “wallopping the nigger!” See English caricatures of America — Slaveholder and cowhide, with the motto: “Haven't I a right to wallop my nigger!” O Englishmen!--in hope and creed, In blood and tongue our brothers I We, too, are heirs of Runnymede; And Shakspeare's fame and Cromwell's deed, Are not alone our mother's. “Thicker than water,” in one rill, Through centuries of story, Our Saxon blood has flowed, and still We share with you its good and ill, The shadow and the glory. Joint heirs and kinfolk, leagues of wave Nor length of years can part us: Your right is ours to shrine and grave, The common freehold of the brave, The gifts of saints and martyrs. Our very sins and follies teach Our kindred frail and human: We carp at faults with bitter speech, The wh
59. I have been to Washington. by Ruth N. Cromwell. I have been to Washington, to see the famous sights, The President, the Cabinet, the people and the fun; The forts, and the batteries, the hills and the heights, The General, and the colonels, and the soldiers every one; The roll, and the reveille, the flourish and the trill; I have been to Washington, to see the famous drill. “Attention, company” --“Turn out your toes.” Roll goes the drum, and loud the bugle blows. Flash go the bayonets, merrily and swift. “Ram down cartridge” --“Prime” --“Charge.” “Fire” --says the Captain, feeling very large. Up speaks the Colonel, tone rather harsh: “Right flank,” “left flank” --“forward march.” Oh I the wisdom, and the strategy, the science, and the skill! I have been to Washington, to see the famous drill. I have been to Washington, to see the splendid show-- Red coats, green coats, blue coats, and grey; Cockade and epaulettes — Zouaves all the go; Dragoons
ird regiment P. V.: camp Birney, Feb. 27, 1862. dear Father: I write you these few lines in very great haste, to let you know that at last we are under marching orders. As you may suppose, everything is bustle and hurry. I have just been handed one hundred rounds of cartridges and four days rations! Of course it is not possible for me to tell you our destination. The camp is in wild excitement. Cheer after cheer is going up, so rejoiced are all the boys at the probability of our meeting the rebels. I doubt not that before this reaches you I shall have my pack upon my back, and be on the march to Dixie's land. I am well and in the very best spirits, and, be assured, shall endeavor to do my duty in every emergency. But I can't spare another moment, except to say to all at home: give yourselves no uneasiness on my account, for I put all my trust in God! What is this but the old doctrine of Cromwell, Trust in God, and keep your powder dry ? Phila. Press, March 6.