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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 149 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 99 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 81 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 54 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 36 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 29 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 23 1 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 9 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 14, 1862., [Electronic resource] 9 3 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Robert L. McCook or search for Robert L. McCook in all documents.

Your search returned 20 results in 6 document sections:

of the division formerly commanded by Gen. Thomas, and now in his corps d'armee, and under Gen. (Port Royal) Sherman, and more particularly the brigade of Gen. Robert L. McCook, whose every movement has fallen under my observation. On Saturday, the seventeenth of May, this brigade, as a part of Gen. Thomas's army, advanced and s brigade were advanced still further; and after the advanced brigades of Gen. Johnson on our left, and Gen. Rousseau on our right had intrenched themselves, Gen. R. L. McCook's brigade moved upon their line. Though the task be a most difficult one, yet I will try to give your readers a faint idea of the scenes which an advance s of war. As Cincinnatians are interested in those who represent her in the field, I cannot close without speaking a word in praise of our Brigadier-General R. L. McCook. The city which sent him forth may well be proud of him. Of his course as Colonel of his gallant Ninth, all are informed, and all are ready to praise. As a
en under my command behaved nobly, and I compliment them for their steadiness under a galling fire, and for the alacrity displayed in obeying every command. The above is respectfully submitted. H. A. Hambright, Colonel Seventy-ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers, Acting Brigadier-General Commanding. M. H. Locher, A. A.A. G. A National account. Nashville, Tenn., June 13, 1862. On Thursday, May twenty-ninth, Gen. Negley, who has been in command of the Seventh brigade--formerly in Gen. McCook's division, but now having a separate command — started from Columbia, Tenn., for the purpose of making an expedition into East-Tennessee, with the intention of threatening Chattanooga and capturing or dispersing any of the rebel forces of cavalry hovering around that portion of the country. It was authoritatively reported that the rebels had made a preconcerted movement for the purpose of recapturing Nashville; but that object was frustrated by the energy and intrepidity of General Negl
he direct road from Springfield to Perrysville, and arrived on the seventh one mile from town, where the enemy was found to be in force. The left column, under Gen. McCook, came upon the Maxville road about ten o'clock yesterday, (the eighth.) It was ordered into position to attack, and a strong reconnoissance directed. At four o'clock I received a request from Gen. McCook for reenforcements, and learned that the left had been seriously engaged for several hours, and that the right and left of that corps were being turned and severely pressed. Reenforcements were immediately sent forward from the centre. Orders were also sent to the right column, underding several valuable officers. Generals Jackson and Terrell, I regret to say, are among the number of killed. D. C. Buell, Major-General Commanding. Major-General McCook's report. headquarters First corps, army of the Ohio, camp near Crab orchard, Oct. 18. Col. Jas. B. Fry, Chief of Staff: I have the honor to report
twenty-first,) and reached Lexington at night. I rode over with Dr. Bush to Paris that night, and found that the men left in charge of Capt. Ayres had gone to Cincinnati the morning previous. I returned to Lexington the same night, and found Col. McCook with your orders. After instructing the Lieutenant in charge of the sick at Lexington to report to Col. McCook the condition of the men, I obtained leave to return home, and arrived here this morning. I have been thus particular in explaininCol. McCook with your orders. After instructing the Lieutenant in charge of the sick at Lexington to report to Col. McCook the condition of the men, I obtained leave to return home, and arrived here this morning. I have been thus particular in explaining to you how I became detached from my particular command, which was entrusted to me by your orders, and to do justice, as near as I can, to the Ohio troops under my charge. I am, General, your obedient servant, J. V. Guthrie, Commanding.
Doc. 172.-the death of General McCook. Order of General Thomas. headquarters First Divisioops of this Division, the death of Brig.-Gen. Robert L. McCook, who departed this life at twelve o route from Athens, Ala., to this place. Gen. McCook entered the volunteer service at the commenio volunteers, under the command of Brig.-Gen. Robert L. McCook, were on their march from Athens, A point near the southern line of Tennessee, Gen. McCook, who was sick, and riding in an open carriae, thus leaving but four of the escort with Gen. McCook--one of whom was dismounted, and Capt. Brooe Thirty-fifth scattered them instantly. Gen. McCook was found in a house near where he was shotnd was wounded by a sabre-cut on the head. Gen. McCook's wagons were fired, but not greatly damagerigade team were taken. The condition of Gen. McCook could not but have been known to the attacksing that the attack was planned solely for Gen. McCook's capture or murder. Infuriated by this co
Georgia; an Alabama regiment, and a Kentucky squadron — all cavalry — all of whom were with him at the battle of the Little Pond, of which I write. Gen. Hascall's and Col. Wagner's brigades of Gen. Wood's division are encamped two miles from McMinnville, on the railroad to Manchester. On the morning of the thirtieth ultimo, it was learned that Forrest's brigade was encamped six miles from here toward Manchester, and arrangements were made to attack him in the morning and drive him on to Gen. McCook or Crittenden, coming up from the east and south. But at four P. M. it was discovered that Forrest was crossing the railroad about two miles from here, and rapidly marching for the McMinnville and Murfreesboro road, which they would gain at a point called Little Pond, six miles from the railroad, eight miles from Wood's camp, and nine miles from McMinnville. The game seemed about to be lost. Not a second to spare. Gen. Hascall being sick in bed, Col. E. P. Fyffe of the Twenty-sixth Oh