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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 50 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 25 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 19 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 17 5 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 15 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 13 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Fagan or search for Fagan in all documents.

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as the telegraphic despatches have been in the habit of reporting it, usually, along the Potomac, during some eighteen months past. But it was a quiet to be of very brief duration here. On the second of December Gen. Blunt received information of a character to leave no doubt upon the subject that the united rebel forces in Western Arkansas, at least twenty-five thousand strong, under the command of Hindman, a Major-General in their service — with Marmaduke, Parsons, Roane, Frost, Shoup, Fagan, and others as brigadiers — were preparing to march upon him from a point midway between Van Buren and Cane Hill, and that they might be looked for at any day; the distance from their position to the latter point being not to exceed twenty miles. Determining at once to hold Cane Hill, unless driven from it by an overwhelming force, General Blunt immediately sent despatches for the Second and Third divisions of the army of the frontier--which he had been advised by Gen. Schofield were placed