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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 20 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 8 0 Browse Search
Owen Wister, Ulysses S. Grant 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 3, April, 1904 - January, 1905 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 4 4 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley. You can also browse the collection for Houghton or search for Houghton in all documents.

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Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.24 (search)
rable admiration for them — indeed, I always had. I feel what all this means, just as I know what is passing in the African's heart, when I suddenly make him rich, instead of hurting him. There is a look, as of a lifting — up of the soul into the eyes, which explains as fully as words. June 20th, 1891. I have nine more lectures to deliver, and then, God and man willing, I shall cast me down for rest. I have just begun to read Walter Scott's Journal. I like it immensely. The Life of Houghton is dull; his own letters are the best in it, but there is no observation, or judgement upon things; merely a series of letters upon town-talk; what he did, seldom, however, what he thought. Where you see his thought, it is worth reading twice. It is a great relief at last to be able to speak my mind, not to be chilled and have to shrink back. Between mother and child, you know the confidence and trust that exist; I never knew it; and now, by extreme favour of Providence, the last few y