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Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 1.4, chapter 1.10 (search)
ank down until the water was up to the furnace-doors. We remained fixed for several hours, but, fortunately, the Rose Douglas came up, and took us and our baggage safely up to Little Rock. We were marched to the Arsenal, and, in a short time, the Dixie Greys were sworn by Adjutant-General Burgevine into the service of the Confederate States of America for twelve months. We were served with heavy flint-lock muskets, knapsacks, and accoutrements, and were attached to the 6th Arkansas Regiment of Volunteers, Colonel Lyons commanding, and A. T. Hawthorn, Lieutenant-colonel. General Burgevine was, in later years, Commander of the Mercenaries, in the Imperial Chinese army against the Taipings, and an ally of General (Chinese) Gordon, at one time. Dismissed by the Imperialists, he sought the service of the Taipings. Wearied of his new masters, he conceived a project of dethroning the Emperor, and reigning in his stead; he went so far as to try and tempt Gordon to be his accomplice!
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 1.4, chapter 1.11 (search)
ing passion that governed all conduct, and moulded public life to its will. Now all men who knew our brigade commander will concede that, whatever virtues he may have had, ambition was his distinguishing characteristic. It was commonly said that he was a man of genius, could command a Department, or be a first-class Minister of War; but, from what I can recollect of him, he aimed at the highest office in the land, and was sufficiently unscrupulous to establish himself as a dictator. Colonel Lyons was purely and simply a soldier: Lieutenant-colonel A. T. Hawthorn was too vain of military distinction, and the trappings of official rank, to have stooped to be a patriot in the ranks; but Captain S. G. Smith was a patriot of the purest dye, of the most patrician appearance, one of the finest and noblest types of men I have ever met: a man of stubborn honour and high principles, brave, and invariably gentle in demeanour and address. Our First-lieutenant was a Mr. Penny Mason, a Virgin
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 1.4, chapter 1.12 (search)
ous to all by his ruthlessness, violence, and tyranny. While at Atlanta, Georgia, in March, 1891, I received the following letter (which is copied verbatim) from old Slate, as we used to call him, owing to a certain quaint, old-mannish humour which characterised him. blue ridge, Ga. March 28th, 1891. dear Sir,--I am anxious to know if you enlisted in Company E., Dixie Greys, 6th Arkansas Regiment, Col. Lyon commanding, Lieut.-Col. Hawthorn, Capt. Smith commanding Dixie Greys, Co. E. Col. Lyons was accidently killed on the Tennessee River, by riding off Bluff and horse falling on him. On the 6th April, 1862, the Confederates attacked the Yankees at Shiloh. Early in the morning I was wounded, and I never saw our boyish-looking Stanley no more, but understood he was captured, and sent North. I have read everything in newspapers, and your Histories, believing you are the same Great Boy. We all loved you, and regretted the results of that eventful day. This is enough for you to
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, Index (search)
ji, 273; character of, 273-278, 281-284, 526; Stanley's parting from, 279, 280; death of, 280; feelings of Stanley at news of his death, 295, 296; letters of, to Sir George Grey, 435. Llys, the, 40. Loafers, thoughts on, 530. Long Hart, 72. Low, Sidney, his article on Stanley's African explorations, 392-404; poem of, on Stanley, 539. Lowell, J. R., Letters of, 458, 459, 461. Lualaba, the, 318-330. See Congo. Lyall, Sir, Alfred, Stanley presides at lecture of, 501. Lyons, Colonel, 168. Machiavelli, 463, 464. Mackay, A. M., 406. Mackinnon, Sir, William, patronises the Emin Relief Expedition, 354; and the East African Company, 446-449; death and funeral of, 446, 449; remarks on, 459, 460. Malone, Tom, 169, 180. Mason, Penny, 165, 169. Manyanga, 335. Marks, Mr., 489, 494. Matabele War, 454, 455. McKenna, Mr., 478. Melchet Court, 423, 428. Milligan, Colonel James A., 205. Milner, Sir, Alfred, on South Africa, 495. Milton, John, 526. Mind a