Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Hooker or search for Hooker in all documents.

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ited photograph of Battery D, Second U. S. Artillery, was, according to the photographer's account, taken just as the battery was loading to engage with the Confederates. The order, cannoneers to your posts, had just been given, and the men, running up, called to the photographer to hurry his wagon out of the way unless he wished to gain a place for his name in the list of casualties In June, 1863, the Sixth Corps had made its third successful crossing of the Rappahannock, as the advance of Hooker's movement against Lee. Battery D at once took position with other artillery out in the fields near the ruins of the Mansfield house. In the rear of the battery the veteran Vermont brigade was acting as support. To their rear was the bank of the river skirted by trees. The grove of white poplars to the right surrounded the Mansfield house. With characteristic coolness, some of the troops had already pitched their dog tents. Better protection was soon afforded by the strong line of earth
sencranz, a Swedish officer, on leave of absence, observing the war at close range as General McClellan's personal aide-de-camp. He successively served Burnside, Hooker and Meade in the same capacity. His brave and genial disposition made him a universal favorite. The other men are Americans, conspicuous actors as well as studeon, in the face of a continual bombardment, dug Dutch Gap Canal on the James. The man in the straw hat is Lieut. Colonel Dickinson, Assistant Adjutant General to Hooker, a position in which he served until the Battle of Gettysburg, where he was wounded. Standing is Captain Ulric Dahlgren, serving at the time on Meade's staff. Eh would have taken two months, say until the end of February, 1865; second, by sending the troops by rail, as Schofield was moved with fifteen thousand men and as Hooker was moved with twenty-three thousand men, and, third, by marching on Sherman's famous feint. Railroad Bridge over the Chattahoochee, 1863 In the foreground
e Peninsula. The rain had fallen in torrents during the greater part of March. The cavalry prepared to bivouac in the rain-soaked fields in front of the Confederate works. All during the evening and even into the night the forces of Sumner and Hooker, floundering in the mud, were arriving on the scene of the next day's battle. It was a drenched and bedraggled army that slept on its arms that night. Early in the morning the troops were again in motion. The approach to Williamsburg is alonharges were made with ammunition taken from the cartridge boxes of fallen comrades. Meanwhile Fighting Phil Kearny was hastening with his regiments over the bottomless roads of the Peninsula. They came most opportunely, and took the places of Hooker's tired and hungry men, who retreated in good order, leaving on the tree-strewn field seventeen hundred of their comrades, who had gone down before the Confederate fire. On the York River side there had been no fighting during the early part o
Fair Oaks or Seven Pines: in sight of Richmond. Henry W. Elson A haven for the wounded — the Seven Pines farm-house serving as a hospital for Hooker's division, shortly after the battle of May 30-June 1, 1862 Bridging the morass From the necessity of getting an army across such barriers as this Chickahominy moing extending along the Nine Mile road to Fair Oaks Station. Heintzelman's corps lay to the rear; Kearney's division guarded the railroad at Savage's Station and Hooker's the approaches to the White Oak Swamp. This formed three lines of defense. It was a well-wooded region and at this time was in many places no more than a bog.hen that there were heard loud shouts from the east of the railroad. There, coming through the woods, was a large body of Federal troops. They were the men of Hooker. They formed a magnificent body of soldiers and seemed eager for the fray. Turning in on the Williamsburg road they rapidly deployed to the right and the left.
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Engagements of the Civil War with losses on both sides December, 1860-August, 1862 (search)
5 killed, 30 wounded. Confed. 155 killed, wounded, and captured. June 18: evacuation of Cumberland Gap, Tenn. By Confederates of Gen. C. L. Stevenson's command, and occupation by Gen. G. W. Morgan's Federal division. June 18, 1862: Williamsburg road, Va. Union, 16th Mass. Confed. No record found. Losses: Union 17 killed, 28 wounded, 14 captured. Confed. 5 killed, 9 wounded. June 25, 1862: Oak Grove, Va., also called Kings school House and the Orchards. Union, Hooker's and Kearney's Divisions of the Third Corps, Palmer's Brigade of the Fourth Corps, and part of Richardson's Division of the Second Corps. Confed., Armistead's brigade. Losses: Union 51 killed, 401 wounded, 64 missing. Confed. 65 killed, 465 wounded, 11 missing. June 26-29, 1862: Vicksburg, Miss. U. S. Fleet, under command of Commodore Farragut, passed the Confederate land batteries, under the cover of bombardment by Commodore Porter's fleet of mortar boats. June 2, 1862