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Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 241 7 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 217 3 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 208 10 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 169 1 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 158 36 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 81 1 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 81 1 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 72 20 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 71 3 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 68 16 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Hancock or search for Hancock in all documents.

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e retained, absorbing the First and Third. Hancock was in command of the Second; Warren, the Fiffor a general attack by Sedgwick, Warren, and Hancock along the entire line, at five o'clock on theith Wright's division of his corps. But with Hancock on the left, in his entrenchments on the Brocng them in some places to abandon the works. Hancock made a gallant and heroic effort to re-form hbout to move north toward Fredericksburg, and Hancock had been ordered to make a reconnaissance witthe first defensive line of the Confederates, Hancock's men advanced against the second series of toth sent some of their divisions to reenforce Hancock, and Lee sent all the assistance possible to it, begun by Grant on May 19th, the corps of Hancock and Warren were pressing forward to Guiney's extinguished by the Federals, and on the 24th Hancock's troops crossed over without opposition. Thny River at one point and Warren at another. Hancock was ordered to take position on the right ban[46 more...]
ey passed along the Brock Road in the rear of Hancock's lines, the men broke into loud hurrahs. Thn's right, in the Wilderness, rested opposite Hancock's left, and the Confederates secured a more dnext, but he was halted to guard the trains. Hancock, covering the move, did not start the head of several thousand stands of arms were taken. Hancock had already distinguished himself as a leaderoth sent some of their divisions to reenforce Hancock, and Lee sent all the assistance possible to at the Bloody angle. Burnside on the left of Hancock engaged Early's Bethel church-waiting for egraph Road, strike Hancock alone, or at most Hancock and Warren. But Lee, fearing perhaps to risks the river. Late in the evening of the 23d, Hancock's corps, arriving before the redoubt, had assby the military as Chesterfield bridge. Here Hancock's Corps arrived toward evening of May 23d, angement followed. The next morning (the 24th) Hancock and Wright put their troops across at places [19 more...]
the pontoons and bridges to facilitate the rapid crossing of the North Anna by Hancock's Corps on May 24th. Thus was completed the passage to the south of the strea that would decide Grant's last chance to interpose between Lee and Richmond. Hancock and the Second Corps arrived at Cold Harbor and took position on the left of G opposite Wright and Smith, while A. P. Hill, on the extreme right, confronted Hancock. There was sharp fighting during the entire day, but Early did not succeed innty minutes. Grant's assault at Cold Harbor was marked by the gallantry of General Hancock's division and of the brigades of Gibbon and Barlow, who on the left of thronts; Smith, that he could go no farther until Wright advanced upon his left; Hancock, that it was useless for him to attempt a further advance until Wright advanceupon his right; Wright, that it was impossible for him to move until Smith and Hancock advanced to his support on his right and left to shield him from the enemy's e
ning was a determined attack made upon them. At this time Hancock, the superb, came on the field. Night was falling but a bhousand men, might have been carried by the Federals. But Hancock, waiving rank, yielded to Smith in command. No further atGrant, in order to get a part of Lee's army away, had sent Hancock's Corps and two divisions of cavalry north of the James, aird attacks by the Confederates upon Reams' Station, where Hancock's men were engaged in destroying the Weldon Railroad on Auback. The Weldon Railroad was lost to the Confederacy. Hancock, who had returned from the north side of the James, proceegust 25th, when General A. P. Hill made his appearance and Hancock retreated to some hastily built breastworks at Ream's Statnes. The men were panic-stricken and were put to flight. Hancock tried in vain to rally his troops, but for once this splenposition. The night came on and, under cover of darkness, Hancock withdrew his shattered columns. The two great opposing
ning was a determined attack made upon them. At this time Hancock, the superb, came on the field. Night was falling but a bhousand men, might have been carried by the Federals. But Hancock, waiving rank, yielded to Smith in command. No further atGrant, in order to get a part of Lee's army away, had sent Hancock's Corps and two divisions of cavalry north of the James, aird attacks by the Confederates upon Reams' Station, where Hancock's men were engaged in destroying the Weldon Railroad on Auback. The Weldon Railroad was lost to the Confederacy. Hancock, who had returned from the north side of the James, proceegust 25th, when General A. P. Hill made his appearance and Hancock retreated to some hastily built breastworks at Ream's Statnes. The men were panic-stricken and were put to flight. Hancock tried in vain to rally his troops, but for once this splenposition. The night came on and, under cover of darkness, Hancock withdrew his shattered columns. The two great opposing
r letter of this date containing the terms of the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia as proposed by you. As they are substantially the same as those expressed in your Appomattox: the landmark of the Confederates' last stand The Union army, after the fall of Petersburg, followed the streaming Confederates, retreating westward, and came upon a part of Gordon's troops near High Bridge over the Appomattox, where the South Side Railroad crosses the river on piers 60 feet high. Hancock's (Second) Corps arrived on the south bank just after the Confederates had blown up the redoubt that formed the bridge head, and set fire to the bridge itself. The bridge was saved with the loss of four spans at the north end, by Colonel Livermore, whose party put out the fire while Confederate skirmishers were fighting under their feet. A wagon bridge beside it was saved by the men of Barlow's division. Mahone's division of the Confederate army was drawn up on a hill, north of the river
r letter of this date containing the terms of the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia as proposed by you. As they are substantially the same as those expressed in your Appomattox: the landmark of the Confederates' last stand The Union army, after the fall of Petersburg, followed the streaming Confederates, retreating westward, and came upon a part of Gordon's troops near High Bridge over the Appomattox, where the South Side Railroad crosses the river on piers 60 feet high. Hancock's (Second) Corps arrived on the south bank just after the Confederates had blown up the redoubt that formed the bridge head, and set fire to the bridge itself. The bridge was saved with the loss of four spans at the north end, by Colonel Livermore, whose party put out the fire while Confederate skirmishers were fighting under their feet. A wagon bridge beside it was saved by the men of Barlow's division. Mahone's division of the Confederate army was drawn up on a hill, north of the river
., iron-clad ram Albemarle. Losses: Union, 5 killed, 26 wounded; Confed., 57 captured. May 5, 1864: Dunn's Bayou, Red River, La. Union, 56th Ohio, gunboats Signal, Covington, and transport Warner. Confed., Gen. Richard Taylor's command on shore. Losses: Union, 35 killed, 65 wounded, 150 missing; Con fed. No record found. May 5-7, 1864: Wilderness, Va. Union, Forces commanded by Gen. U. S. Grant; Army of the Potomac, Maj.-Gen. George G. Meade; Second Corps, Maj.-Gen. Hancock; Fifth Corps, Maj.-Gen. Warren; Sixth Corps, Maj.-Gen. Sedgwick; Cavalry Corps, Maj.-Gen. Sheridan; and Ninth Corps, Maj.-Gen. Burnside. Confed., Army of Northern Virginia, Gen. R. E. Lee; First Corps, Lieut.-Gen. Longstreet; Second Corps, Lieut.-Gen. Ewell; Third Corps, Lieut.-Gen. A. P. Hill; Cavalry Corps, Maj.-Gen. Stuart. Losses: Union, 2246 killed, 12,137 wounded, 3383 missing; Confed. (estimate) 2000 killed, 6000 wounded, 3400 missing; Union, Brig.-Gens. Wadsworth