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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 178 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 164 20 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 112 16 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 22 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 10 0 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 6 4 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 6 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 18, 1863., [Electronic resource] 5 1 Browse Search
L. P. Brockett, Women's work in the civil war: a record of heroism, patriotism and patience 5 1 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 5 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Francis Lieber or search for Francis Lieber in all documents.

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al Congressional legislation on the prison question. The policies of the Governments were fixed very largely, as might be expected, by the Department of War, which issued orders for the care of prisoners. The army regulations provided, in a general way, for the prisoners taken by the Federals, but the circulars of instruction issued from the office of the commissary-general of prisoners formed the basis for most of the rules of the separate prisons. Later, the distinguished publicist, Francis Lieber, was selected to draw up rules for the conduct of armies in the field. These were published as General Orders No. 100, April 24, 1863, and constitute a long and minute code, including regulations for prisoners. The only general legislation of the Confederate Congress during the whole period of the war was an act approved May 21, 1861. It reads as follows: An act relative to prisoners of war approved, May 21, 1861 The Congress of the Confederate States of America do enact, T