Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Greenville (Mississippi, United States) or search for Greenville (Mississippi, United States) in all documents.

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noes or dugouts. The following incident is quoted from Dr. C. J. Edwards, of Abbeville, Louisiana: Many and daring were the attempts of the distressed Confederates to obtain medicines during the war. In 1863, when Grant was besieging Vicksburg and his gunboats patrolling the Mississippi had cut the Confederacy in twain, my father was detailed from Wright's Arkansas cavalry, an independent command, to procure some quinine, calomel, and opium. He crossed the Mississippi River at Greenville, Mississippi, and proceeded with a buggy and horse to Canton, where he obtained the supplies. He made the return trip safely to the Mississippi River, only to find a gunboat in close proximity and no means of traversing the mighty stream, then bank-full. After considerable search he found an Thomas H. Williams, medical director of the first Confederate army in Virginia Dr. Williams was one of the regular army surgeons whose convictions led him to join the Southern cause. As medical dire
noes or dugouts. The following incident is quoted from Dr. C. J. Edwards, of Abbeville, Louisiana: Many and daring were the attempts of the distressed Confederates to obtain medicines during the war. In 1863, when Grant was besieging Vicksburg and his gunboats patrolling the Mississippi had cut the Confederacy in twain, my father was detailed from Wright's Arkansas cavalry, an independent command, to procure some quinine, calomel, and opium. He crossed the Mississippi River at Greenville, Mississippi, and proceeded with a buggy and horse to Canton, where he obtained the supplies. He made the return trip safely to the Mississippi River, only to find a gunboat in close proximity and no means of traversing the mighty stream, then bank-full. After considerable search he found an Thomas H. Williams, medical director of the first Confederate army in Virginia Dr. Williams was one of the regular army surgeons whose convictions led him to join the Southern cause. As medical dire