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The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Arrest W. H. Winder or search for Arrest W. H. Winder in all documents.

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. Suspicion and ill-feeling were prevalent, since the attitude of many thousands toward the Union was a matter of uncertainty. Spies and informers developed in such numbers as to remind one of the days of later Rome. Into the ears of the Government officials a constant stream of suspicion was poured. As a result the arrest of hundreds was ordered without warrants on the simple order from the State or War Department, chiefly the former. Some typical orders read as follows: Arrest W. H. Winder and send him to Fort Lafayette, New York. W. H. Seward, Secretary of State. Arrest man referred to in your letter of the 11th and send him to Fort Lafayette. Simon Cameron, Secretary of War. Provost office, Department of the Cumberland, at Nashville, Tennessee The provost-marshals in a department had (or assumed) powers depending in extent somewhat upon the character of the commander. Their position required sound judgment and great discretion. Some of the officers a