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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 1,239 1,239 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 467 467 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 184 184 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 171 171 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 159 159 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 156 156 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 102 102 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 79 79 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 77 77 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 75 75 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for 1862 AD or search for 1862 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 10 results in 7 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Address on the character of General R. E. Lee, delivered in Richmond on Wednesday, January 19th, 1876, the anniversary of General Lee's birth (search)
of general in the army of the Confederate States. Still more familiar to you than these facts are the events of which you and I had personal knowledge: how Lee organized, patiently and skilfully, the raw resources of Virginia; how he directed the coast defences of the South Atlantic States, and how he labored against a thousand difficulties in the mountains of West Virginia, serenely accepting without a murmur the popular verdict on what ignorant presumption adjudged a failure. In June of 1862 he was at length placed in a command to meet whose vast responsibility his life had been the preparation, and at once his name became forever linked with that Army of Northern Virginia which met and mastered army after army, baffled McClellan, and destroyed successively Pope, Burnside and Hooker; which twice invaded the enemy's country, and which, when at last against it was thrown all the resources of the United States, Grant in its front and Sherman in its rear, Europe for their recruiting
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Dahlgren's ride into Fredericksburg. (search)
at Falmouth, the exploit of this youthful hero, though very creditable to him, seems not so distinguished by its boldness or success. I append a letter from Major Kelly, from whom I hoped to obtain an accurate account of — the affair. He was then editor of the Fredericksburg Herald, in which paper a minute and accurate account of every incident of the day was published the next morning. Most respectfully, John Critcher, Lieutenant-Colonel Commanding at Fredericksburg in the autumn of 1862. Fredericksburg, April 19, 1872. Judge Critcher: Dear Sir — I regret very much that I am unable to assist you materially in the review you propose of the article sent in regard to Dahlgren's ride into Fredericksburg. The files of the Herald during the war fell a prey to the ravages of the times, and I have not the slightest recollection of any facts that I may then have written. The first intimation I had of the affair was a small colored boy's coming into the chamber (about 8 o'
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
and prompt remittances. Subscribers are entitled to receive their papers just as soon as they pay for them, and we cannot, of course, send them until the agent reports the names to us. Contributions to our archives continue to come in, and our collection grows more and more valuable every day. Among others received we acknowledge now the following: From Mr. Yates Snowden, of Charleston, S. C.: The land we love for 1868, and two numbers for 1869; a number of war newspapers for 1861, 1862, 1863 and 1864; a number of valuable Confederate pamphlets. From A. Barron Holmes, Esq., of Charleston, S. C.: Caldwell's History of Gregg's (McGowan's) South Carolina brigade; Holmes' Phosphate Rocks of South Carolina ; Report of the Committee on the Destruction of Churches in the Diocese of South Carolina during the late War, presented to the Protestant Episcopal Convention, May, 1868. (This report shows that in the diocese of South Carolina the enemy burned ten churches and tore down t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Early's Valley campaign. (search)
aryland and a bold advance on Washington City. As his instructions were discretionary, he was at liberty to adopt that course, which at the time was both in a political and military point of view the best plan of action that could have been assumed. The defence of Richmond being the settled policy of the Confederate Government, General Lee had on two occasions assumed the offensive in order to relieve that place from the paralyzing influence of the Federals. The invasion of Maryland in 1862 and the campaign into Pennsylvania the following year had relieved Richmond of the presence of the enemy for more than a year, but the tide of war had again returned, and that celebrated city was gradually yielding to the powerful embrace of her besiegers, which could only be loosened by a strong diversion in her favor. This Early undertook with the force at his command, after the disposal of Hunter's army. By uniting with his own corps the division of Breckinridge and Ransom's cavalry, E
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Maryland troops in the Confederate service. (search)
l length of service of the First regiment was fourteen to sixteen months. Second Maryland infantry. The Second Maryland infantry was organized in the fall of 1862, and numbered six companies. Two other companies joined them afterward, one in about two months and the other about a year after their organization. They were in service up to the surrender of General Lee at Appomattox. During the fall and winter of 1862-3 they were attached to General Jones' cavalry brigade, and were on duty in the Valley of Virginia; being constantly on the move, and made two very severe marches to Moorefield in West Virginia. In June, 1863, they joined General Earlllery were in the expedition, and acted with courage and discipline when under fire. The Fourth Maryland ( Chesapeake ) Artillery was organized in the spring of 1862, under command of Captain William Brown, who was killed at Gettysburg, after which Captain Chew took command. They served in the Army of Northern Virginia, and to
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
I). (Mr. Holmes frequently places the Society under obligations for similar favors). From the Society of the Army of the Tennessee--Report of proceedings at tenth annual meeting held at Washington, D. C., on the occasion of unveiling the equestrian statue of Major-General James B. McPherson. From Colonel F. H. Archer, of Petersburg--A bundle of very interesting original papers (reports, letters, telegrams, &c.) of operations and movements about Suffolk, Smithfield, &c., in the spring of 1862. From General Fitz. Lee--Sketch of the life and character of the late General S. Cooper, Senior General and Adjutant and Inspector-General of the Confederacy, together with a letter from ex-President Davis giving his impressions of General Cooper. From General J. A. Early, General Fitz. Lee, General E. P. Alexander, General A. L. Long, General Cadmus M. Wilcox, Colonel Walter H. Taylor and General Henry Heth--Papers on the battle of Gettysburg. (These papers discuss the policy of invad
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of General J. E. B. Stuart of cavalry operations on First Maryland campaign, from August 30th to September 18th, 1862. (search)
Report of General J. E. B. Stuart of cavalry operations on First Maryland campaign, from August 30th to September 18th, 1862. [We were suprised to find the following report missing from the published reports of the campaign of 1862, and can only account for the omission by reference to the late date at which it was sent in. As it has never, we believer been printed in any other form, and is a report of importance and value, we give it from the original autograph Ms. of the great cavalrymant engaged with the enemy, and at Sharpsburg was several times subjected to severe shelling. Their services were indispensable to every success attained, and the officers and men of the cavalry division recur with pride to the Maryland campaign of 1862. I regret exceedingly that I have not the means of speaking more in detail of the brave men of other commands whose meritorious conduct was witnessed both at Sharpsburg and Williamsport, but whose names owing to the lapse of time cannot be now