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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Operations of General J. E. B. Stuart before Chancellorsville. (search)
that General Lee received opportune intelligence of what was passing on his left. Neither the records nor events themselves justify this view of the case. General Stuart, usually so vigilant, seems on this occasion to have been surprised. General Hooker says that four hours after his three corps had crossed the Rappahannock the Southern cavalry were still picketing Richards' ford, and the writer knows that when, thirty-six hours after the passage, General Meade came within sight of Chancello, General Stuart had not yet interposed any body of horse between his advance and Fredericksburg. Nor is it possible that General Lee received timely information of the Federal operations. It is incredible that he would, by choice, have allowed Hooker to concentrate at Chancellorsville with the option, when there, of taking his line in reverse, or of moving upon his line of communications and forcing a battle upon unequal terms. Two brigades (Mahone's and Posey's) of Lee's army were stationed
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), McClellan and Lee at Sharpsburg (Antietam).--a review of Mr. Curtis' article in the North American review. (search)
0 men, held McClelland's army in check all day. On the 15th, Stonewall Jackson, with 9,793 Confederates, captured over 11,000 Federals, more than 70 cannon, several thousand horses, and all of their small arms, colors and equipments! On the 15th, Lee took position at Sharpsburg, with 17,460 infantry and several thousand cavalry and artillery, while McClellan's army confronted him on the line of the Antietam. On the 16th, about 3 P. M., McClellan assaulted Lee with the three corps of Hooker, Mansfield and Sumner, which were so severely punished, that McClellan tells us that about the middle of the afternoon he went in person to the scene and found the aspect of affairs anything but promising ; in fact, they were driven from the field by Lee in utter confusion. On the 17th, the attack was renewed by McClellan with a fresh corps. During the day Stonewall Jackson came to Lee — his force was 9,793 infantry, which brought Lee's whole army up to 27,253 infantry, and less than 8,0
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Williamsburg and the charge of the Twenty-fourth Virginia of Early's brigade. (search)
e van retired. That evening McLaws was relieved, as already said, by R. H. Anderson, commanding the brigades of Anderson and Pryor. In the morning, after much skirmishing, without advantage to the enemy, he appeared on the right, in force under Hooker, attacking with spirit, but, though reinforced by Kearney, he was pressed back, driven and almost routed. Testimony before Congressional Committee on Conduct of War. Part I, pages 353-366. Here was fighting pretty much all day, but night foundursuit was fifteen miles in rear, and had remained below Yorktown Evidence of Governor Sprague and others before Congressional Committee on Conduct of War.--he took no part in what was going on around him; and though importuned for aid by both Hooker and Kearney, who were almost routed, he declined to part with a man; and when Hancock, finding the empty redoubt on the left, ventured into it, he actually commanded him to return. In fact, he seems to have forgotten that he was in pursuit of wh
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), History of Lane's North Carolina brigade. (search)
ery. General Thomas, responding to the call of General Lane, rapidly threw forward his brigade of Georgians by the flank, and deploying by successive formations, squarely met the enemy, charged them, and joined by the Seventh and part of the Eighteenth North Carolina, drove them back with tremendous loss to their original position. . . . . Extract from General T. J. Jackson's report. The Federal troops, consisting of the main body of Franklin's grand division, supported by a portion of Hooker's grand division, continued to press forward. Advancing to within point-blank range of our infantry, and thus exposed to the murderous fire of musketry and artillery, the struggle became fierce and sanguinary. They continue however, still to press forward, and before General A. P. Hill closed the interval which he had left between Archer and Lane, it was penetrated, and the enemy pressing forward in overwhelming numbers through that interval, turned Lane's right and Archer's left. Thus at
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 8.70 (search)
bservation. And here it must be conceded that had Stuart followed Longstreet's crossing at Shepherdstown, and operated upon that flank, he could have gained information concerning the enemy only by using individual scouts, or by making reconnoissances in force. For the latter purpose, the cavalry under his command was utterly insufficient. Unless provided with an infantry support, Stuart could have made no movement which would have held out any hope of piercing the cavalry which enveloped Hooker's advance; and a reconnoissance of Southern cavalry, supported by infantry, is something which I do not remember ever to have occurred in the army of Northern Virginia. General Early speaks wisely when he says: It is doubtful whether the former alternative would have enabled him (Stuart) to fulfill General Lee's expectations. The only other ground upon which complaint could justly be urged against Stuart is that he denuded the army of its cavalry. But I have already shown that he left up
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Cleburne and his division at Missionary ridge and Ringgold gap. (search)
to bestow it. Remaining in undisturbed possession of the position on Dick's ridge until dark, Cleburne, in obedience to orders, marched to Tunnel Hill, where he arrived about midnight, and where his weary troops had their first regular ration since the 25th. On the next morning he occupied the line of Tunnel Hill, where the division remained on outpost duty until the opening of the campaign in May, 1864. A few days after reaching Tunnel Hill, Cleburne received a flag of truce from General Hooker at Ringgold in regard to exchange of prisoners. Of Cleburne's troops it need only be said that they were worthy of their commander — a man of lofty courage, and pure patriotism, unerring in his military instincts, and quick and resolute in the execution of his plans, which once matured, never miscarried. So uniform was his success, that at length friend and foe alike learned to note the place in the battle of his original blue battle flag, the distinctive mark of Cleburne's division
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Chancellorsville. (search)
the Chancellorsville House by the Confederates carrying the salient to our right, where General Stuart, in command of Jackson's corps, elicited loud shouts of admiration from the infantry as he in person gallantly rushed them over the works upon Hooker's retreating columns. James H. Lane, Late Brigadier-General C. S. A. The above article was written at the request of Mr. Moses Handy (then connected with the Dispatch) while I was on a visit to Richmond, and unable to refer to any of my papemade Major-General. Pender's division was composed of Lane's North Carolina, Thomas' Georgia, McGowan's South Carolina, and Scales' North Carolina brigades. The other brigades of A. P. Hill's old Light division --Archer's Tennesseeans and Brockenbrough's Virginians — formed part of a new division commanded by Major-General Heth. Soon after Hooker's defeat at Chancellorsville, we were ordered back to our winter quarters at Moss Neck, where we remained until General Lee invaded Pennsylvania
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Lookout Valley, October 28, 1863. (search)
accomplishment of the end in view; that a failure would be the result, and that the troops engaged in it would be seriously injured. I was satisfied, from close and constant observation, that not less than six or eight thousand troops had been thrown across the river from Moccasin bend; that one corps (six or seven thousand more) had passed my position going toward Brown's ferry, and that another of the same strength was following This estimate of force, I learned from a staff-officer of Hooker's command, Eleventh and Twelfth corps, whom I met in New York a few weeks ago, was perfectly correct. General Jenkins replied that he had positive orders to proceed on the expedition. He desired me to send him two guides, who knew the country beyond the creek. These were accordingly sent, and I immediately commenced the passage of the creek, having previously ordered my brigade under arms. A few minutes after crossing, my advance guard captured a prisoner, who represented himself as bel
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Some of the secret history of Gettysburg. (search)
osed position of Richmond and the landing of Federal troops at City Point, could not send forward any more reinforcements, and that the assemblage of an auxiliary army at Culpeper Court-house to attack Washington, so soon as General Lee had drawn Hooker's (Meade's) army sufficiently far north into Pennsylvania to be out of supporting distance, was impossible of accomplishment. Dahlgren stated that on discovering the purport of the dispatch and appreciating its importance he rode as fast as his points to which the rebel government is sending reinforcements, and the precarious condition in which it considers its capital to be. The object of the campaign was the capture of Washington, which was to be effected in this wise: Lee was to draw Hooker into Pennsylvania sufficiently far to uncover Washington, which Beauregard, with 30,000 men, to be concentrated at Culpeper Court-house, was then to attack and take. But, as further appears from these dispatches, Jeff. Davis felt unable to spare