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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 36 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Carlton McCarthy or search for Carlton McCarthy in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Origin of the Confederate battle flag. (search)
Origin of the Confederate battle flag. by Carlton McCarthy. [The facts concerning the origin of the battle flag contained in this article are derived from a speech by General Beauregard before a special meeting of Louisiana Division, Army of Northern Virginia, Association, December 6, 1878.--C. McC.] This banner, the witness and inspiration of many victories, which was proudly borne on every field from Manassas to Appomattox, was conceived on the field of battle — lived on the field of battle — and on the last fatal field ceased to have place or meaning in the world. But the men who followed it, and the world which watched its proud advance or defiant stand, see in it still the unstained banner of a brave and generous people, whose deeds have outlived their country, and whose final defeat but added lustre to their grandest victories. It was not the flag of the Confederacy, but simply the banner — the battle flag — of the Confederate soldier. As such it should not share
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
cksburg, and was a really magnificent affair. The banquet, served in the best style of the St. Claire hotel, and presided over by Judge George L. Christian, was really superb, and was heartily enjoyed by all present. The speeches of W. J. Hardy, of New York, the orator of the evening, and Leigh Robinson, Esq., of Washington, O. G. Clay, Jr., Captain Henry Hudnall, and Rev. Dr. J. B. Hawthorne of Richmond, who responded to the regular toasts, and of Rev. G. W. Dame, of Baltimore, and Carlton McCarthy, Esq., of Richmond, who responded to volunteer toasts, were all admirable, and were well worth preserving in permanent form. We expect to publish one or two of them in some future issue. Our Executive Committee has been enlarged; there have been one or two changes in it, and it is now composed as follows: General J. A. Early, Lynchburg, President of the Society; Hon. R. M. T. Hunter, Essex county, Vice-President; Rev. J. William Jones, Secretary and Treasurer; General D. H. Ma
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Literary notices. (search)
collected in the course of a long life. But the library itself [which is to be sold at auction, January 18th, 1881, by John E. Laughton, Jr., Richmond, Va.,] is a rare collection of valuable books, whose value is greatly increased by the Manuscript Notes of Mr. Green, who was unquestionably one of the most profound jurists, one of the best read lawyers, and one of the most accomplished men in general literature which this country ever produced. The collection has many rare books, enhanced in value by autographs of former owners, both in England and America, notes, book-plates, etc., and collectors will miss a rare opportunity if they fail to secure a catalogue, or to be represented at the sale. Persons desiring information can address Mr. R. A. Brock, Secretary Virginia Historical Society, who deserves great credit for his skillful compilation of the catalogue, and those unable to attend the sale can send their orders to Carlton McCarthy, or either of our other local booksellers.