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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 178 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 85 1 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 83 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 62 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 55 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for W. M. Polk or search for W. M. Polk in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Tribute to the Confederate dead. (search)
r than song, and there is a remembrance of the dead to which we turn, even from the charms of the living. For those faces and that figure brought the dead to life. There was Albert Sidney Johnston, coming out from the cloud and mist of misapprehension and detraction, vindicated in his dying as the peer of the most illustrious in that grand galaxy of generals, statesmen, and heroes that have made the name and fame of the Southern Confederacy immortal. There was Louisiana's bishop-general, Polk, who, with a lofty soul, a clear conscience, and an abiding faith, and clad in the divine panoply, wore also with ease and grace the armor of human strife. There was Stonewall Jackson, flashing through the conflict the very genius of battle. And there, too, was Lee, first in war, first in peace, and still first in all our hearts. And above, and of right crowning that monumental shaft and looking down upon that heroic group, stood that figure leaning upon his gun, a mute, yet eloquent remin
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes and Queries. the wounding of Stonewall Jackson. (search)
of the affair. These statements are all perfectly conclusive, and show beyond all cavil, that our great chieftain was shot down by the fire of his own men, who would gladly have laid down their lives for him. Towns Burned by Federal Troops. The following letter explains itself: Oxford, Miss., Mar. 30, 1882. Rev. J. William Jones, Secretary Southern Historical society: Dear Sir,--I have just read in your January and February number, a letter to you from my brother-in-law, W. M. Polk, with a chapter from a forthcoming work — The Life of Leonidas Polk. I read also with interest a letter from Rev. H. E. Hayden. I will add another to the list of towns wantonly burnt by Federal officers during the war. There were no Confederate forces in this part of the country, when General Smith, belonging to General Grant's army, ordered this town to be burnt. All the houses around the square (except a small fire-proof store), the court-house, Jacob Thompson's residence, James Br