Browsing named entities in Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative. You can also browse the collection for Rosser or search for Rosser in all documents.

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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 20: battle of the Wilderness (search)
ker, H. A.80 Guns Archer WilcoxLaneMcGowanScalesThomas cavalry. Stuart, Hampton HamptonYoungRosserButlerChew Lee, F.LomaxWickham20 Guns Lee, W. H. F.ChamblissGordon Our narrative may pause appeals for help from two directions. From Spottsylvania C. H., one and a half miles in front, Rosser's brigade reported itself as being driven by Wilson's division of cavalry, coming from the direcavalry. The other brigades of the same division, Wofford and Bryan, went on ahead to the aid of Rosser. Haskell's battalion of artillery went with Kershaw and Humphreys. Fitz-Lee was defending someobserved, were withdrawn to the rear through the thicket, mounted and taken by Lee to the aid of Rosser. Kennedy and Humphreys had hardly gotten into position when they were charged by the three br Wilson's cavalry, having held Spottsylvania C. H. for two hours, was withdrawn by Sheridan, as Rosser, reenforced by Fitz-Lee, was moving upon him. Wofford and Bryan now rejoined Field. Meanwhile
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 23: the fall of 1864 (search)
ble affair had taken place on this date, between a small force under Gen. Read, sent ahead by Ord to burn the High Bridge on the Lynchburg road, and Dearing's and Rosser's cavalry. The expedition consisted of two regiments of infantry and about 80 cavalry. They had gotten within a mile of the bridge, when our cavalry, in much laCol. Washburn, and three other cavalry officers were killed. After heavy loss the rest of the force surrendered. Gen. Dearing, Col. Boston, and Maj. Thompson of Rosser's command were among the killed. About sundown, the enemy at Rice's showed a disposition to advance, and Lee soon gave orders to resume our retreat. In the mht interruption. Crook's division of cavalry forded the river on our left and moved toward our train. Gregg's brigade, in the lead, was charged by Mumford and Rosser, and Gregg and a bunch of prisoners were captured, on which the rest of the division was withdrawn. Our march was now kept up all night and the next day until su