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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 146 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 62 14 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 16 0 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 6 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 5 1 Browse Search
John D. Billings, The history of the Tenth Massachusetts battery of light artillery in the war of the rebellion 5 1 Browse Search
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant 4 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative. You can also browse the collection for Po River (Virginia, United States) or search for Po River (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 20: battle of the Wilderness (search)
njoyed a great advantage in having the initiative. Lee could not know until after daylight in the morning whether Grant's entire army had left his front or not. In any event, our two divisions could have no reenforcements during the greater part of the day. Thanks to the good work of Hampton's division at Corbin's Bridge, we passed that danger point safely. Our artillery, from Parker's store, came by the Shady Grove road, and about daylight we joined the two divisions of infantry near the Po River, where the column halted for an hour to rest and eat breakfast, expecting this to be a busy day. For already we could hear the beginning of some fighting two miles to our left, indicating that the Federal columns were finding our cavalry in their way. The Federals, however, were sure that they had won the race. Mr. Dana, Asst. Sec. of War, who was with Grant at the time, wrote of it afterward, as follows:— I remember distinctly the sensation in the ranks when the rumor first went ar