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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 16 16 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.) 5 5 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 3 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 3 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 3 3 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 2 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 2 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. 2 2 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1100 AD or search for 1100 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Curfew Bell, (search)
Curfew Bell, The name applied to a bell signal introduced in England in 1068. It was rung at 8 P. M., and all fires and candles were to be immediately extinguished. The curfew was abolished in 1100, so far as its original purpose was concerned. In the United States there has been quite an agitation within the last few years for the enactment of laws providing for the ringing of bells at 9 P. M., as a signal for all youth of a specified age playing or wandering in the streets to return immediately to their homes. In several States laws for this purpose have already been enacted, and the name of curfew bell has been popularly given to the signal rung out on a church or fire bell.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Waldenses (search)
Waldenses (also called Valdenses, Vallenses, and Vaudois), a sect inhabiting the Cottian Alps, derive their name, according to some authors, from Peter de Waldo, of Lyons (1170). They were known, however, as early as 1100, their confession of faith published 1120. Their doctrine condemned by the council of Lateran, 1179. They had a translation of the Bible, and allied themselves to the Albigenses, whose persecution led to the establishment of the holy office or inquisition. The Waldenses settled in the valleys of Piedmont about 1375, but were frequently dreadfully persecuted, notably 1545-46, 1560, 1655-56, when Oliver Cromwell, by threats, obtained some degree of toleration for them; again in 1663-64 and 1686. They were permitted to have a church at Turin, December, 1853. In March, 1868, it was stated that there were in Italy twenty-eight ordained Waldensian ministers and thirty other teachers. Early in 1893 a delegation was sent to the United States to investigate the adv