Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for George W. Carter or search for George W. Carter in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Louisiana, (search)
death of Lieutenant-Governor Dunn, the election of P. B. S. Pinchback by the Senate in extra session is claimed as unconstitutional by the opposition, led by George W. Carter, speaker of the House, and known as Carterites ......Nov. 22, 1871 Warmouth legislature meets at Mechanics' Institute; the Carterites over the Gem saloon, on Royal Street, Jan. 6. Colonel Carter, by proclamation, proposes to seize the Mechanics' Institute building, and appears before it with several thousand men, but is prevented by General Emory......Jan. 22, 1872 In extra session the House, in the absence of Colonel Carter, declares the speaker's chair vacant, chooses O. H. Colonel Carter, declares the speaker's chair vacant, chooses O. H. Brewster speaker, and approves the course of Governor Warmouth......1872 Act passed funding the indebtedness of the State......April 30, 1872 Conventions of the two wings of the Republican party at Baton Rouge, headed respectively by Packard and Pinchback. The Packard convention nominates William Pitt Kellogg for governor..
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Washington, Mary 1706-1659 (search)
of age she wrote to her brother in England on family matters a letter which is still in existence, the conclusion of which is as follows: We have not had a school-master in our neighborhood until now (Jan. 14, 1728) in nearly four years. We have now a young master living with us, who was educated at Oxford, took orders, and came over as assistant to Reverend Kemp, of Gloucester. That parish is too poor to keep both, and he teaches school for his board. He teaches sister Susie and me and Madam Carter's boy and two other scholars. I am now learning pretty fast. Mamma, Susie, and I all send love to you and Mary. This letter from your loving sister, Mary Ball. Mary Ball married Augustine Washington in 1730. Their first child was George Washington, who, when seventeen years of age, wrote the following memorandum in his mother's Bible: George Washington, son to Augustine and Mary, his wife, was born the eleventh day of February, 1731-32, about ten in the morning, and was baptized th