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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 693 51 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 610 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 83 39 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 70 2 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 50 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 42 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 42 2 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 41 3 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 28 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 27 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Jonesboro (Georgia, United States) or search for Jonesboro (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 15 results in 10 document sections:

Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Battles. (search)
il 12, 1864 Wilderness (Va.)May 5 and 6, Spottsylvania Court-House (Va.)May 7-12, 1864 Resaca (Ga.)May 14 and 15, Bermuda HundredMay 10, 1864 New Hope Church (Ga.)May 25, 1864 Cold Harbor (Va.)June 1-3, 1864 Petersburg (Va.; Smith's Attack)June 16, 1864 Weldon Road (Va.)June 21 and 22, Kenesaw (Ga.)June 27, 1864 Peach-tree Creek (Ga.)July 20, 1864 Decatur (Ga.)July 22, 1864 Atlanta (Ga.)July 28, 1864 Petersburg (Va. ; Mine Explosion)July 30, 1864 Mobile BayAug. 5, 1864 Jonesboro (Ga.)Aug. 31 and Sept. 1, 1864 Atlanta (Ga.; Captured)Sept. 2, 1864 Winchester (Va.)Sept. 19, 1864 Fisher's Hill (Va.)Sept. 22, 1864 Allatoona Pass (Ga.)Oct. 6, 1864 Hatcher's Run (Va.)Oct. 27, 1864 Franklin (Tenn.)Nov. 30, 1864 Fort McAllister (Ga.)Dec. 14, 1864 Nashville (Tenn.)Dec. 15 and 16, Fort Fisher (N. C.; First Attack on)Dec. 24 and 25, Fort Fisher (N. C.; Capture of)Jan. 15, 1865 Hatcher's Run (Va.)Feb. 5, 1865 Averasboro (N. C.)Mar. 16, 1865 Bentonville (N. C.)Mar.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861 (search)
rs in favor of this abolition platform are not satisfactory. I ask Abraham Lincoln to answer these questions, in order that, when I trot him down to lower Egypt, I may put the same questions to him. My principles are the same everywhere. I can proclaim them alike in the North, the South, the East, and the West. My principles will apply wherever the Constitution prevails and the American flag waves. I desire to know whether Mr. Lincoln's principles will bear transplanting from Ottawa to Jonesboro? I put these questions to him to-day distinctly, and ask an answer. I have a right to an answer; for I quote from the platform of the Republican party, made by himself and others at the time that party was formed, and the bargain made by Lincoln to dissolve and kill the Old Whig party, and transfer its members, bound hand and foot, to the abolition party, under the direction of Giddings and Fred Douglass. In the remarks I have made on this platform, and the position of Mr. Lincoln upo
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Frankland, state of. (search)
Frankland, state of. In 1784, North Carolina ceded her western lands to the United States. The people of east Tennessee, piqued at being thus disposed of, and feeling the burdens of State taxation, alleging that no provision was made for their defence or the administration of justice, assembled in convention at Jonesboro, to take measures for organizing a new and independent State. The North Carolina Assembly, willing to compromise, repealed the act of cession the same year, made the Tennessee counties a separate military district, with John Sevier as brigadier-general, and also a separate judicial district, with proper officers. But ambitious men urged the people forward, and at a second convention, at the same place, Dec. 14, 1784, they resolved to form an independent State, under the name of Frankland. A provisional government was formed; Sevier was chosen governor (March, 1785); the machinery of an independent State was put in motion, and the governor of North Carolina (
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Jonesboro, battle of. (search)
Jonesboro, battle of. Sherman began his flanking when he raised the siege of Atlanta (q. v.), on the night of Aug. 25, 1864. General Slocum, with the 20th Corps, proceeded to the protection of the sick, wounded, and stores near the Chattahoochady Station, 10 miles from Atlanta. Thomas struck it at Couch's; and Howard, crossing the Flint River half a mile from Jonesboro, approached it at that point. There he was met by one-half of Hood's army, under Hardee. With the remainder Hood was by Howard. Hardee recoiled, and in his hasty retreat left 400 of his dead on the field and 300 of his badly wounded at Jonesboro. His loss was estimated at 2,500 men. Howard's loss was about 500. Meanwhile Sherman had sent relief to Howard. Kilp soon touched Howard's left. At four o'clock in the afternoon Davis charged and carried the Confederate works covering Jonesboro on the north, and captured General Govan and a greater part of his brigade. In the morning Hardee had fled, pursued by
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Kilpatrick, Hugh Judson (search)
of Wheeler's raid, sent Kilpatrick, with 5.000 cavalry, during the night of Aug. 18, 1864, to strike the railway at West Point, Ga., and break it to Fairborn, and then to tear up the Macon road thoroughly. When he reached the Macon road, near Jonesboro, he was confronted by Ross's Confederate cavalry. These he routed, and drove through Jonesboro, and just as he began tearing up the road some cavalry came up from the south, and compelled him to desist and fly. He swept around, and again struce reached the Macon road, near Jonesboro, he was confronted by Ross's Confederate cavalry. These he routed, and drove through Jonesboro, and just as he began tearing up the road some cavalry came up from the south, and compelled him to desist and fly. He swept around, and again struck the road at Lovejoy's, where he was attacked by a larger force. Through these he dashed, capturing and destroying a four-gun battery, and sweeping around, reached headquarters on the 22d, with seventy prisoners.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Lee, Stephen Dill 1833- (search)
Lee, Stephen Dill 1833- Educator: born in Charleston, S. C., Sept. 22. 1833; graduated at the United States Military Academy in 1854, and was first lieutenant of the 4th Artillery till 1861, serving also as quartermaster for three years. He afterwards entered the Confederate army as captain and was promoted to lieutenant-general. He commanded the Confederates at Chickasaw Bayou, Miss., where Sherman was defeated, and in the battles of Tupelo, Miss.; Jonesboro, Ga.; Atlanta, Ga.; Nashville, Franklin, etc., and took part in the operations around Richmond. After the war he became a planter in Mississippi. In 1870 he was a member of the Mississippi State Senate; in 1890 was a delegate to the constitutional convention of Mississippi; and since 1880 has been president of the Mississippi Agricultural and Mechanical College.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
a......Aug. 15, 1864 General Grant seizes the Weldon Railroad......Aug. 18, 1864 Democratic National Convention meets at Chicago, Aug. 29; Horatio Seymour chosen president of the convention and platform adopted, Aug. 30. On first ballot for President, Gen. George B. McClellan, of New Jersey, has 174 votes (as revised and declared, 202 1/2); nomination made unanimous. George H. Pendleton, of Ohio, nominated on the second ballot for Vice-President......Aug. 31, 1864 Battles of Jonesborough, Ga.......Aug. 31–Sept. 1, 1864 Hood evacuates Atlanta, Ga.......Sept. 1, 1864 Gen. John H. Morgan killed at Greenville, Tenn.......Sept. 4, 1864 General McClellan's letter accepting nomination, dated Orange, N. J.......Sept. 8, 1864 Fremont withdraws in favor of Lincoln and Johnson, by letter......Sept. 17, 1864 Battle of Winchester, Va.......Sept. 19, 1864 Battle of Fisher's Hill, Va.......Sept. 22, 1864 General Price invades Missouri......Sept. 24–Oct. 28, 1864 En
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), North Carolina, (search)
General Assembly at Hillsboro, among acts for relief of the general government, cedes her western lands and authorizes her delegates to execute a deed provided Congress would accept the offer within two years......April, 1784 Convention at Jonesboro appoints John Sevier president, and resolves that a person be despatched to Congress to press the acceptance of the offer of North Carolina......Aug. 23, 1784 General Assembly meets at Newbern and repeals the act of April 23, regarding the cession of western lands......Oct. 22, 1784 Convention of five delegates from each county meets at Jonesboro, chooses John Sevier president, and forms a constitution for the State of Frankland......Dec. 14, 1784 Constitution for the new State of Frankland accepted by a convention of the people, which meets at Greenville and chooses John Sevier to be governor of the State......November, 1785 Governor Caswell, of North Carolina, by proclamation denounces the revolt of Frankland as usurp
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wherry, William M. 1836- (search)
Wherry, William M. 1836- Military officer; born in St. Louis, Mo., Sept. 13, 1836; received a public school education, and studied law; served through the Civil War; took part in the battles of Wilson's Creek, Dallas, Kenesaw Mountain, Atlanta, Jonesboro, Franklin, Nashville, and others; aide-de-camp to General Schofield in 1862-66 and 1867-85; served in Cuba during the American-Spanish War, taking part in the battle at San Juan Hill and in the capture of Santiago; was promoted brigadier-general, United States army, Jan. 7, 1899, and retired at his own request, Jan. 18, 1899. He is the author of Battle of Wilson's Creek, Mo.; Death of General Lyon; Battles and leaders of the Civil War; and Lyon's campaign in Missouri in the Journal of the Ohio Commandery, Loyal Legion, vol. III., 1896-97.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Woods, William Burnham 1824-1887 (search)
Woods, William Burnham 1824-1887 Jurist; born in Newark, O., Aug. 3, 1824; graduated at Yale College in 1845; studied law and practised in his native place. After the outbreak of the Civil War he entered the army as lieutenant-colonel of the 76th Ohio Volunteers; participated in the actions at Shiloh, Chickasaw Bayou, Dallas, Atlanta, Jonesboro, etc., and in the sieges of Vicksburg and Jackson; was promoted brigadier-general of volunteers, and brevetted major-general March 13, 1865. After the war he resumed the practice of law; was United States judge of the 5th circuit in 1869-80, and associate justice of the United States Supreme Court in 1880-87. He died in Washington, D. C., May 14, 1887.