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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 150 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 14 4 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 10 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 4 0 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 2 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Grant in peace: from Appomattox to Mount McGregor, a personal memoir 2 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Women and Men 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Cairo (Egypt) or search for Cairo (Egypt) in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 8 document sections:

Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ballou, Maturin Murray, 1820-1895 (search)
Ballou, Maturin Murray, 1820-1895 Journalist; born in Boston, Mass., April 14, 1820; was educated in the Boston High School. In 1838 he entered journalism on the Olive branch, a weekly. Later he became proprietor and editor of Ballou's monthly and Gleason's pictorial. He became one of the founders of the Boston Daily globe in 1872, and for many years was its chief editor. He also had a part or whole interest in Ballou's pictorial ; The flag of our Union, and the Boston Sunday budget. His works include Due West; Due South; Due North ; Under the Southern cross; The New El Dorado; Aztec land; The story of Malta; Equatorial America; Biography of the Rev. Hosea Ballou. He died in Cairo, Egypt. March 27, 1895.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Consular service, the (search)
incident thereto. The consul-general at Athens, Bucharest, and Belgrade is paid $6,500. He is also envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary to Greece, Rumania, and Servia, and serves in all the above offices for one and the same salary. The consul-general at Havana receives $6,000, and the consul-general at Melbourne $4,500. There are twelve offices where $5,000 are paid, viz.: Rio de Janeiro, Shanghai, Paris, Calcutta, Hong-Kong, Liverpool, London, Port au Prince, Rome, Teheran, Cairo, and Bangkok (where the consul is also minister resident); seven offices where $4,000 are paid, viz.: Panama, Berlin, Montreal, Honolulu, Kanagawa, Monrovia, and Mexico; seven where $3,500 are paid, viz.: Vienna, Amoy, Canton, Tientsin, Havre, Halifax, and Callao; thirty-one where $3,000 are paid; thirty where $2,500 are paid; and fifty-one where $2,000 are paid. The remaining ninety-five of the salaried officers receive salaries of only $1,500 or $1,000 per annum. Consular officers are
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Diplomatic service. (search)
les Burdett Hart, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Bogota. Costa Rica. William L. Merry, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, San Jose. Denmark. Laurits S. Swenson, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Copenhagen. Dominican republic. William F. Powell, Charge d'affaires, Port au Prince. Ecuador. Archbald J. Sampson, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Quito. Egypt. John G. Long, Agent and Consul-General, Cairo. France. Horace Porter, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, Paris. German Empire. Andrew D. White, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, Berlin. Great Britain. Joseph H. Choate, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, London. Greece, Rumania, and Servia. Arthur S. Hardy, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Athens. Guatemala and Honduras. W. Godfrey Hunter, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Guatemala City.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Farman, Elbert Eli 1831- (search)
Farman, Elbert Eli 1831- Jurist; born in New Haven, Oswego co., N. Y., April 23, 1831; graduated at Amherst College in 1855, and studied in Warsaw, N. Y., where he was admitted to the bar in 1858. He studied in Europe in 1865-67, and on returning to the United States was made district attorney of Wyoming county, N. Y. In March, 1876, he was appointed United States consul-general at Cairo, Egypt, and there became a member of the commission to revise the international codes. Later President Garfield appointed him a judge of the international court of Egypt. He was also a member of the international committee appointed to investigate the claims of citizens of Alexandria for damages caused by the bombardment of that city by the British in 1882. It was principally through his efforts that the obelisk known as Cleopatra's needle, which stands near the Metropolitan Art Museum in Central Park, New York City, was secured. When he left Egypt, Mr. Farman received from the Khedive the de
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Foote, Andrew Hull 1806- (search)
re at war, Foote exerted himself to protect American property, and was fired upon by the Celestials. His demand for an apology was refused, and he stormed and captured four Chinese forts, composed of granite walls 7 feet thick and mounting 176 guns, with a less of forty men. The Chinese garrison of 5,000 men lost 400 of their number killed and wounded. In the summer of 1861 Foote was made captain, and in September was appointed flag-officer of a flotilla of gunboats fitted out chiefly at Cairo, and commanded the naval expedition against Fort Henry (q. v.) and Fort Donelson (q. v.) on the Tennessee and Cumberland rivers, early in 1862, in co-operation with General Grant. In the attack on the latter he was severely wounded in the ankle by a fragment of a shell. Though suffering, he commanded the naval attack on Island number ten (q. v.). After its reduction he returned to his home at New Haven. He was promoted to rear-admiral in July, 1862; and in May, 1863, was ordered to take c
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ledyard, John 1751- (search)
nd the world as corporal of marines. He vainly tried to set on foot a trading expedition to the northwest coast of North America, and went to Europe in 1784. He started on a journey through the northern part of Europe and Asia and across Bering Strait to America in 1786-87. He walked around the whole coast of the Gulf of Bothnia, reaching St. Petersburg in the latter part of March, 1787, without money, shoes, or stockings. He had journeyed 1,400 miles on foot in less than seven weeks. Thence he went to Siberia, but was arrested at Irkutsk in February, 1788, conducted to the frontiers of Poland, and there dismissed with an intimation that if he returned into Russia he would be hanged. The cause of his arrest was the jealousy of the Russian-American Trading Company. Going back to London, Ledyard accepted an offer to engage in the exploration of the interior of Africa. He left England in June, 1788, and at Cairo, Egypt, was attacked by a disease which ended his life, Jan. 17, 1789.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Lewis, Meriwether (search)
by this time had changed her mind, and forbidden his proceeding. He was put into a close carriage, and conveyed day and night, without ever stopping, till they reached Poland, where he was set down and left to himself. The fatigue of this journey broke down his constitution; and when he returned to Paris his bodily strength was much impaired. His mind, however, remained firm; and he after this undertook the journey to Egypt. I received a letter from him, full of sanguine hopes, dated at Cairo, Nov. 15, 1788, the day before he was to set out for the head of the Nile, on which day, however, he ended his career and life; and thus failed the first attempt to explore the western part of our northern continent. In 1792 I proposed to the American Philosophical Society that we should set on foot a subscription to engage some competent person to explore that region in the opposite direction; that is, by ascending the Missouri, crossing the Stony Mountains, and descending the nearest ri
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Schuyler, Eugene 1840-1890 (search)
e in 1859, and at the Columbia Law School in 1863; engaged in practice in 1863-66; was United States consul at Moscow in 1866-69; at Reval in 1869-70; secretary of the United States legation at St. Petersburg in 1870-76; at Constantinople in 1876-78; charge d'affaires at Bucharest in 1880-82; minister to Greece, Servia, and Rumania in 1882-84; and consul-general at Cairo from 1889 till his death. He contributed to magazines and wrote American diplomacy. He died in Cairo, Egypt, July 18, 1890.ge in 1859, and at the Columbia Law School in 1863; engaged in practice in 1863-66; was United States consul at Moscow in 1866-69; at Reval in 1869-70; secretary of the United States legation at St. Petersburg in 1870-76; at Constantinople in 1876-78; charge d'affaires at Bucharest in 1880-82; minister to Greece, Servia, and Rumania in 1882-84; and consul-general at Cairo from 1889 till his death. He contributed to magazines and wrote American diplomacy. He died in Cairo, Egypt, July 18, 1890.