hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 34 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for William Henry Winder or search for William Henry Winder in all documents.

Your search returned 17 results in 3 document sections:

Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Barney, Joshua, 1759- (search)
oe, James). He was a warm partisan of the French, and entered their navy as commander of a squadron, but resigned his commission in 1802. When the War of 1812-15 broke out, he engaged in privateering with much success. He was appointed captain in the United States navy in April, 1814, and placed in command of a flotilla of small vessels for the defence of the coasts of the Chesapeake. Driven up the Patuxent by a British fleet, he destroyed his vessels, and with over 500 men he joined General Winder in the defence of Washington (Bladensburg, Battle of.). Barney was severely wounded (Aug. 24, 1814) near Bladensburg, and made a prisoner. Too much hurt to be removed as a prisoner, he was paroled and sent to Bladensburg, near by, on a litter. There he was joined by his wife and son and his own surgeon, and was conveyed to his farm at Elkridge, Md. The bullet that gave him the wound, from which he never fairly recovered, is preserved in the Navy Department. The corporation of Washingt
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bladensburg, battle of. (search)
Bladensburg, battle of. In 1814 General Winder warned the President and his cabinet of the dangnd and naval force, the alarmed Secretary gave Winder a carte blanche, almost, to do as he pleased iwere made for the defence of the capital. General Winder, relieved from restraint, called upon the . 22. 1814), and with his men hastened to join Winder at his headquarters. When General Ross arrivea of barges. To oppose this formidable force, Winder had less than 3,000 effective men, most of the and at dawn the next morning (Aug. 24), while Winder was in consultation with them at his headquart a severe contest began. The troops under General Winder, including those from Baltimore (about 2.2nly 6-pounders. With these troops and weapons Winder might have driven back the invaders, had he belitia break and flee in the wildest disorder. Winder tried in vain to rally them. Another corps he, in which the commodore was severely wounded, Winder ordered a general retreat. Barney was too bad[3 more...]
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Winder, William Henry 1775-1824 (search)
Winder, William Henry 1775-1824 Military officer; born in Somerset county, Md., Feb.. 18, 1775; graduated at the University of Pennsylvania; studied law, and began practice in Baltimore in 1798. In March, William Henry Winder. he was appointed lieutenant-colonel of the 14th United States Infantry, and colonel in July followWilliam Henry Winder. he was appointed lieutenant-colonel of the 14th United States Infantry, and colonel in July following. He served on the Niagara frontier, under General Smyth, and in March, 1813, was commissioned brigadier-general. Made prisoner at Stony Creek, Canada, he was exchanged, and became inspector-general, May 9, 1814. Assigned to the command of the 10th District (July 2, 1814), he was in command of the troops in the battle of Blat (July 2, 1814), he was in command of the troops in the battle of Bladensburg, and engaged in the unsuccessful defence of Washington, D. C. General Winder resumed the practice of his profession after the war, in which he was distinguished, and served with credit in the Senate of Maryland. He died in Baltimore, Md., May 24, 1824.