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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 65 11 Browse Search
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 57 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 39 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 22 4 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 21 1 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 20 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 18 2 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 9 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 9 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for John L. Worden or search for John L. Worden in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 1 document section:

Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Monitor and
Merrimac
. (search)
rom the sea, under the command of Lieut. John L. Worden (q. v.), unheralded and unknown, at a little past midnight, March 9, on its trial trip. It had been named Monitor. It had been towed to the Roads by steamers, outriding a tremendous gale. Worden reported to the flag-officer of the fleet in the Roads, and was ordered to aid the Minnesota in the expected encounter with the Merrimac in the morning. It was a bright Sabbath morning. Before sunrise the dreaded Merrimac and her company came dr in great peril, the Monitor ran between The New Ironsides and monitor. them. A most severe duel ensued, and as a result the Merrimac was so much disabled that she fled up to Norfolk, and did not again invite her little antagonist to combat. Worden was severely injured by concussion in the tower of the Monitor, and for a few days his life was in peril. This class of vessels was multiplied in the National navy, and did good service. A comparison of the appearance of the two vessels may be