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George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 3 (search)
for some glimmer of hope that the dreaded resort to arms might be averted. No politician, in the petty sense, he was, in the highest, penetrated with a pure love of country, and believed that, if only time could be gained for reflection, the sober second thought of the people would end in their return to common-sense and reason. In accordance, therefore, with his belief in the wisdom of the most conservative course, he had, in the presidential election of 1860, cast his vote for Bell and Everett. The position at this time of officers of the regular army was an exceedingly trying one, especially for those who, like Captain Meade, were fully alive to the grave responsibility attaching to them as officers of the government, on whose example much depended. The defection of those officers who saw fit to cast their lot with the Confederacy caused the actions of all to be scrutinized, and often misunderstood, in the then excited frame of the public mind. In many instances the suspici
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 6 (search)
not much changed, except being considerable greyer than I used to see him years ago. Headquarters army of the Potomac, December 3, 1864. I received the two volumes of the Army and Navy Review (British) and have read with great interest Captain Chesney's critique of the battle of Gettysburg. It is decidedly the most impartial account of this battle that I have read, and I think does more justice to my acts and motives than any account by my countrymen, including the grand address of Mr. Everett. What has struck me with surprise is the intimate knowledge of many facts not made very public at the time, such as Slocum's hesitation about reinforcing Howard, Butterfield's drawing up an order to withdraw, and other circumstances of a like nature. This familiarity with details evidences access to some source of information on our side, other than official reports or newspaper accounts. Captain Chesney's facts are singularly accurate, though he has fallen into one or two errors. I w
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), Appendix G (search)
arned victory, in one of the greatest and best fought battles of the war. As a public journalist, we cannot allow such a record to be made in the face of the well-known history of the battle of Gettysburg, now made classic by the eloquence of Everett, and in view of the important part the gallant Hooker and his chief of staff performed preliminary to, and during the battle, without entering our solemn protest against it. And in doing this, we do not mean to detract in the slightest degree fr by winning such a victory over the best disciplined army the rebels have in the field, in a series of battles which commenced only about forty-eight hours after he assumed command of the Army of the Potomac, even upon the plans of another! Mr. Everett, in his oration at Gettysburg, did not fail to do Gen. Hooker justice; nor did Gen. Lee, the leader of the crestfallen and defeated rebel army. We regret the more, therefore, that the General-in-Chief of the army of the United States, in maki
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 17 (search)
&C., &C., &C. To the editor of the Herald: The Battle of Gettysburg is the decisive battle of this war. It not only saved the Capital from invasion, but turned the tide of victory in our favor. The opinion of Europe on the failure of the rebellion dates from this great conflict. How essential then, that its real history should be known. Up to this moment no clear narrative has appeared. The sketches of the press, the reports of Generals Halleck and Meade and the oration of Mr. Everett give only phases of this terrible struggle, and that not very correctly. To supply this hiatus I send you a connected, and I hope, lucid review of its main features. I have not ventured to touch on the thrilling incidents and affecting details of such a strife, but have confined myself to a succinct relation of its principal events and the actors therein. My only motive is to vindicate history, do honor to the fallen and justice to the survivors when unfairly impeached. General Mead
t, A. F., I, 227. Du Pont, Henry, I, 9. Duvals, I, 9. Dwight, Gen., II, 281. E Early, Jubal A., I, 196; II, 19, 20, 22, 24, 26, 27, 42, 45, 48, 50, 57, 60, 61, 69, 92, 93, 99, 100, 107, 222, 230. Eaton, Joseph H., I, 12. Ellicott, Col., I, 271. Ellis, Rudolph, I, 384. Ellis, Mrs. Thos. La R. (Appolline), I, 353. El Palo Alto, battle of, May 8, 1846, I, 78-80, 83, 84. Emory, Campbell D., II, 254, 273. Emory, Wm. H., I, 111. England, Mr., II, 225. Everett, Edward, I, 213; II, 249, 318, 319, 323. Ewell, Richard S., I, 196, 386; II, 16, 19, 24, 26-28, 31, 41, 42, 45, 48, 51, 57, 60, 61, 69, 90, 95, 99, 100, 102, 128, 131, 211, 270, 310, 327, 352, 353, 355, 373, 383, 384, 388. F Fairfax, Major, I, 389. Fairfax, Mrs., I, 389. Fair Oaks, battle of, May 31 to June 1, 1862, I, 271. Falls, Col., I, 302. Farias, Gomez, I, 190. Fassitt, J. B., II, 399. Faulkner, Charles J., II, 274. Featherstone, W. F., I, 287, 290, 292. Fel