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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 522 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 106 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 104 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 92 0 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 46 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 46 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 38 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 28 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 22 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 16 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade). You can also browse the collection for Quebec (Canada) or search for Quebec (Canada) in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 4 (search)
te freely with our rear. We have received the news of the fall of New Orleans, which caused much rejoicing, and of the death of General Smith, which was received with deep regret by all those who knew him. McDowell has his headquarters back at Acquia Creek Station. He was in camp to-day with Lord George Paulet, commander of the English forces at Montreal, and did me the honor to call at my quarters and introduce his lordship, which was not necessary, however, as I had met him in 1842 in Quebec, when I was there with Graham and Schroeder. The people that are living around here are all pretty strongly tinctured with Secesh. The men are away, and the women are as rude as their fears will permit them to be. Dr. Meredith Clymer has joined our division, with the expectation of being medical director, and being at Division Headquarters, but as he is junior to Stocker, the arrangement cannot very well be made, and I expect Stocker will go to McCall and Clymer come to me. camp o
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 7 (search)
plan and present beauty are owing to his individual efforts. While inspecting the forts within his command, along the northern frontier, in the autumn of this year (1867), General Meade was induced again to visit Canada. Going to Montreal and Quebec, he was received with the same hospitality that had attended his former visit. At Quebec he was the guest at a state dinner of the governorgeneral, Lord Monk, and was otherwise handsomely entertained by the officers of the army in garrison thereQuebec he was the guest at a state dinner of the governorgeneral, Lord Monk, and was otherwise handsomely entertained by the officers of the army in garrison there. Both on this visit and the preceding one he carefully examined into the system of military prisons as established by the British Government, in which our own government was at that time entirely deficient. His observations and suggestions on this subject were embodied in several communications to the War Department, and attention was repeatedly called in his annual reports to the importance of some such system as the British being adopted for the army of the United States. Among the many