Browsing named entities in Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight). You can also browse the collection for Cours or search for Cours in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 1 document section:

d by operators in the diving-bell, as practiced by Smeaton at Ramsgate Harbor. Coursed-rubble masonry is laid in courses with occasional headers; the side joints are not necessarily vertical, nor the stones in a course of an even thickness. Cours′es. (Nautical.) The sails sustained by the lower masts; as the foresail, mainsail, and spanker. Cours′ing-joint. The mortar-joint between two courses of bricks or stones. Court-plas′ter. Silk surfaced with a solution of balsamCours′ing-joint. The mortar-joint between two courses of bricks or stones. Court-plas′ter. Silk surfaced with a solution of balsam of benzoin. Cous′si-net. (Architecture.) The impost stone on the top of a pier. Cashcon. Cove. 1. (Architecture.) a. A hollow forming a member of some cornice-moldings or ceiling-ornamentation. b. The concavity of an arch or ceiling. 2. (Shipbuilding.) An arched molding at the foot of the taffrail. An elliptical molding sprung over it is called the arch of the cove. Coved Ceil′ing. One with a hollow of about a quarter-circle running round the room, si