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y difficult substance to cut, and requires a strong knife to pass through any considerable quantity. The knife must also have a draw or shear cut, and requires frequent grinding. One form of paper-cutter is a straight-edge and traveling knife. Another has a revolving traveling knife sliding on a bar parallel with a stationary knife which acts as one blade of a shears. Another form has a knife hinged at one end, which descends on a pile of paper with a shear cut. See card-cutter. Sanborn's paper-cutter (Fig. 3524) has a cast-iron frame which sustains the horizontal bed T′ upon which the paper to be cut is placed. Working through vertical slots or guides, formed in the upper part of the frame just mentioned, is the knife-stock Z, which carries the knife or cutter, the latter being detachable, so that when required it may be removed for sharpening. The cutter-stock is suspended from a horizontal cross-piece at the top of the frame by means of two toggles or swinging-bars,
l. j′, Pierce's rail. k′, Peckham's rail. l′, Perkins's rail. m′, Shephard's steel-top rail. n′, Day and Mercer's rail. o′, Dwight's rail. p′, Zahn's rail. q′, Johnston's rail. r′, Stephens and Jenkins's rail. s′, Sanborn's tubular rail. t′, Sanborn's rail. u′, Angle's L-rail on continuous sleeper. v′, Dean and Coleman's street-car rail. w′, rail and sleeper, for the East Indies. The sleeper is bent from a plate of wroughtiron to resist the attacks oSanborn's rail. u′, Angle's L-rail on continuous sleeper. v′, Dean and Coleman's street-car rail. w′, rail and sleeper, for the East Indies. The sleeper is bent from a plate of wroughtiron to resist the attacks of insects which destroy wooden sleepers. Parkin's vitrified sleeper, patented in England in 1835, consists of hard sleepers of molded and baked blocks laid in continuity, tongues and recesses on adjacent blocks serving to lock them together. A timber strip was interposed between the row of blocks and the rail. Grime's English patent, 1831, specified a hollow rail charged with steam from stationary boilers at intervals of two or three miles, and intended to keep
alum. 101,268.Asbestus, marble-dust, pipe-clay, gypsum, glycerine, mucilage, sulphate magnesia, sulphate soda, borax, alum, sal-soda, paraffine. Safes and vaults using water or steam for protection in case of fire :— HorsfordNo. 39,919 SanbornNo. 63,331 AshcroftNo. 66,062 BryantNo. 66,790 BryantNo. 67,154 SanbornNo. 67,220 BryantNo. 67,629 AshcroftNo. 70,390 Eaton and IrelandNo. 71.288 BryantNo. 79,808 BryantNo. 79.809 BryantNo. 86,356 RobertsonNo. 101,044 PutnamNo. 104,35SanbornNo. 67,220 BryantNo. 67,629 AshcroftNo. 70,390 Eaton and IrelandNo. 71.288 BryantNo. 79,808 BryantNo. 79.809 BryantNo. 86,356 RobertsonNo. 101,044 PutnamNo. 104,352 ShortNo. 116,227 Fire-proof safe. Fig. 4529 shows a safe with exterior and interior walls, with intervening non-conducting filling. The door is also double. Hall burglar-proof safe. Fig. 4530 is a view of Hall's safe, in which the plates are dovetailed together, and angle-irons are tenoned into the corners to make them mutually sustaining. Fire-proof safe with water-jacket. Fig. 4531 is a safe having hollow walls connected with the city main. Marvin's burglarproof s